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Letters to the editor – Sunday (9-20-09)

Fatal shooting shouldn’t be blamed on video gameReading the Salisbury Post article “Fatal shooting may be related to video game,” my disappointment and sadness were immense. This was not only for the tragic loss of life that should not have happened. Pointing to a scapegoat, even if associated by the ever-convenient wording of “may,” is sidestepping the issues, with responsibility shifted away from where it belongs. Perhaps it’s only for a moment, but that moment need never exist. A video game should not be used to explain a situation where a young man, an adult, did something stupendously hideous to his flesh and blood. It’s sickening to blame some game, some action in a game, or some content in a game for what you are foolish enough to do.
Society continues to try to blame such media for our woes. It asks us to believe that personal choice, responsibility and common sense are somehow lesser to this digital god of influence. We want answers, sure; but not focusing on the real variables behind the repeated criminal histories of these young people is only making a mockery of everything we fight against on a local, state and national level.
A tragedy occurred, and our community sees this all too often. It comes from deeper core issues in these childrens’ lives and bad choices made along the way. A severe lack of judgment caused this travesty, not some strings of computer code used as recreation. Please do not dishonor the dead with such nonsense. If you care about stopping these sorts of horrible events, then volunteer your time and donate money to worthy organizations and otherwise focus on bettering the lives of our youth through many avenues. As they grow, it is their will and choices in life that will bring about either great good or great evil.
ó L.. Ray Porter
Salisbury
It’s not about race
I am usually not the type to openly speak my mind when it comes to politics. I usually cast my vote for the election, and only voice my opinion when asked.
At a speech in Atlanta, former President Jimmy Carter accused Rep. Joe Wilson and the majority who appose Obamacare of racism. Carter commented that, “An overwhelming portion of the intensely demonstrated animosity toward President Barack Obama is based on the fact that he is a black man, that he’s African American.”
Like Carter, I grew up in the South (in Salisbury) and have seen racist tensions. Where I come from, I have many African-American friends. I have been a member of an African-American church and have sat under an African-American pastor. I have worked with and supported foreign black missions organizations around the world.
I found Jimmy Carter and other politicians’ accusations of racism toward Southerners, Republicans and other politicians to be a personal slap in the face. The Joe Wilson accusations of racism are based on the fact that he is a white, Republican, Southern American.
I believe such comments add racial tension to this nation. Are we not allowed to voice our opinion of our president or question our president without being accused of racism?
What kind of impact will such comments have on the African-American view of white Americans?
I recognize that there may be a few who hold the view that Carter expressed, but the majority believe that America needs a different change, a change that will bring more freedom to Americans and less control of government.
Mr. Carter, you lie, and I will remain silent no more.
ó Ben Lesley
Forest, Va.
Roasted ACORNs
Congress voted Thursday to de-fund ACORN. Reps. Larry Kissell and Patrick McHenry voted to cut off taxpayer money; Rep. G.K. Butterfield voted to continue funding, and Rep. Mel Watt voted “present,” which basically means he is for funding, but you didn’t hear him say so.
“Common Sense,” are you still out there?
ó John Walls
Salisbury

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