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Letters to the editor – Monday (8-31-09)

Ted Kennedy fought for a just society
In this harsh time of political fighting, our anger, fear and anxiety seem to have taken precedence over our desire for a truly just society in America. Ted Kennedy fought his entire life for that just society, always for our beleaguered, less fortunate and oppressed neighbors.
His legislation for the handicapped elevated our country to a higher moral plane. His legislation in Massachusetts gave his small state some of the finest institutions of higher learning in the nation and accessible to all. He held fast to the vision of health care for every person on our soil, that no man, woman or child be without care.
Ted Kennedy was a flawed man, but he held the torch of hope high enough that we were able to see the better road to travel. Without this light of hope for a truly just society, our eyes cloud over with self interest and we are unable to see how great is our possibility if we work together for the greater good. May we all come together to raise the torch again.
ó Whitney Peckman
Salisbury
Health care for all
I’m 59 years old and have been without health insurance for about 11 months. My husband is 6 years older than me. He retired in October, and his company doesn’t carry insurance on its retirees.
I’ve tried to get health insurance. I have blood-sugar problems, high blood pressure and thyroid problems. I don’t run to the doctor like some people all the time. I go once a year so I can get my medicines refilled. I’m not poor enough to get help from anybody. I can’t get disability, and I’m not rich enough to pay $800 a month for health insurance. One insurance company wanted $800 a month for a year before it even started paying on claims. That’s a big joke ó to pay premiums for a year and still have to pay for my doctor and medicines for that year.
It’s time someone gets things under control and treats the rich, the poor and the middle-class people the same. Also, treat the sick and the well the same. We didn’t ask to have these problems.
I would like the United States to have the same health care that Canada and England have. Maybe people like me could get the care we need and can’t afford.
ó Hellen Daywalt
Cooleemee
How lucky I am
I have kept track of the flyers from local car dealers lately. One scratches off a dot to see if he wins, usually, one of four prizes. I have won a prize for the last 27 entries. (Have not gone by to see which one.) Is everyone this lucky? Maybe I should play the lottery! Good luck.
ó R.E. (Dick) Wooten
Salisbury
Tribute to a friend
One never knows what an impact taking time for someone will mean to them. Cindy Dawn Carriker Stewart was my friend of 32 years. A frightened 15-year-old 10th grader at South Rowan asked me if I would help her find her homeroom and her schedule of classes.
I said yes.
The 10th grader said, “I am Cindy Dawn Karriker,” and I replied that my name was George Ray Elliott, a 16-year-old 11th grader.
Cindy loved high school football, and she attended many games in her three years at South. She even found something positive in a loss.
Many years passed, and Cindy and I did not see one another. In the latter part of 2004 or the first part of 2005, I entered Porky’s in China Grove. I asked Marvel, another waitress, who the blonde was walking behind the counter. Marvel replied, “Cindy Weddington.”
Cindy stopped at the left end of the counter and she pointed to the “George” nameplate on the front of my Food Lion uniform.
I said, “Yes, Cindy, I am the same person who at the age of 16 helped a frightened a 15-year-old find her way around South Rowan.”
I told Cindy I was between my 21st and 22nd year at Food Lion. Our friendship rekindled.
After a while, Cindy’s daughter Jessica Weddington worked at Porky’s during the summer while at N.C. State.
Cindy’s warm and beautiful smile will have an impact on me the rest of my life. I am a better person who took advantage of the positive influence Cindy’s warmth and her witnessing of belief in God had on my life.
ó George R. Elliott
China Grove

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