• 81°

Books at library can help with caring for parents

Dr. Betty Middleton
Rowan Public Library
Our journey through life comes with many challenges, but the most difficult of all can be caring for an aging parent. The number of adult children caring for a parent is now more than 19 million, and about 80 percent of these are cared for at home.
There are many questions that need to be answered. Mainly, “Am I doing the right thing?” You love your parents and want to do what is best for them to make their lives easier along the way. To begin with, you and your siblings will need to know how to bring up sensitive subjects like money, insurance, driving, long term care and especially where the legal documents are kept and the authorities that prepared these documents.
If you are unsure where to begin, look for the many helpful titles available at Rowan Public Library.
One of the best among these is the book, “How to Care for Aging Parents,” by Virginia Morris. Thoroughly researched, well-organized, and comprehensive, this manual is arranged in a logical progression that can stand alone or be read on an as-needed basis.Morris includes emotional, legal, financial, medical and logistical issues that can arise in caring for the elderly.
Joy Loverde has compiled “The Complete Eldercare Planner: Where to Start, Which Questions to Ask, and How to Find Help.” As the title implies, this guide presents the information in a series of checklists, step-by-step planning guides, lists of low-cost/free resources, Web site index, and questions to ask.
“Caring for Your Parents: the Complete AARP Guide,” written by Hugh Delehanty and Elinor Ginzler, is advertised as “not just a ‘how-to book,’ but a ‘how-to-think’ book.” It contains AARP’s field-tested recommendations on health-care options, Medicare laws, as well as steps needed to preview an assisted-living residence.
These are just three of the many titles available to help walk you through the process of helping your parents grow old gracefully and happily.
Computer classes: Classes are free. Sessions are 90 minutes long. Class size is limited and on a first-come, first-served basis. Dates and times are subject to change without notice.
Headquarters ó Monday, 7 p.m., Introduction to Learning Express Library; Thursday, 2:30 p.m., Introduction to Yahoo e-mail; April 20, 7 p.m., Introduction to Career Library; April 23, 2:30 p.m., Open Office Up Close-Calc.South ó Thursday, 11 a.m., Basic Windows; April 27, 7 p.m., Intermediate Excel.
Children’s Storytime: February-April, weekly story time. For more information, call 704-216-8234.
Headquarters ó Monday or Wednesday, 11 a.m., Tiny Tots and Moms (infants-18 months); Tuesday, 10 a.m., Toddlers and Kinfolks (18-24 months), and 11 a.m., Toddlers and Kinfolks (24-36 months); Thursday, 10:30 a.m., Three through Five; 4 p.m., Noodlehead (4-8 years).
South ó Monday, 10:30 a.m., Preschool Time (3-5 years), 4 p.m., Noodlehead (4-8 years); Wednesday, 10:30 a.m., Toddlers and Twos (12-36 months); Thursday, 10:30 a.m., Baby Time (0-12 months).
East ó Tuesday or Wednesday, 10:30 a.m., Preschool (2-5 years); Thursday, 11 a.m., Baby Time (6 months-2 years).
Teen program: South, April 21, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; East, April 23, 5:30-7 p.m.; Headquarters, April 27, 5:30-7 p.m. Come to Rowan Public Library for a day of recycled crafts. Make picture frames out of old CDs and DVDs to created an altered book ó let imagination be your guide.
Tuesday Night at the Movies: All movies are at 6:30 p.m. All movies are rated G, PG or PG 13; some movies are inappropriate for younger audiences. Children should be accompanied by an adult. Free popcorn and lemonade.April movies have Rowan connections.
Tuesday, “Coffee Therapy”; April 21, “College Swing”; April 28, “High Society.”
Displays: Headquarters ó artwork by Delores Medlin, history room by RPL; South ó student art show by South Rowan High School art class; East ó 4-H.Literacy: Call the Rowan County Literacy Council at 704-216-8266 for more information on teaching or receiving literacy tutoring for English speakers or for those for whom English is a second language.

Comments

Comments closed.

Crime

Blotter: April 14

Elections

Former North Carolina Gov. McCrory enters US Senate race

Crime

Salisbury woman arrested in Myrtle Beach for abducting child

Health

County updates health director job description, will advertise for position

High School

High school tennis: East beats Carson, still hopes to share NPC title

Elections

Board of Elections to purchase upgraded voting equipment using federal grant

Kannapolis

Kyle Seager drives in winning run in first game as Mariners split doubleheader with Orioles

Local

City exhausts this year’s funds for Innes Street Improvements, Municipal Services District grant programs

Landis

Landis adopts amendments to Zoning Ordinance related to signs, Planning Board terms

Nation/World

Cop, police chief resign 2 days after Black motorist’s death

Nation/World

Expert says cop was justified in pinning down George Floyd

Crime

Blotter: April 13

Coronavirus

County switches vaccines for Livingstone clinic after federal, state guidance

Coronavirus

US recommends ‘pause’ for J&J vaccine over clot reports

Education

Superintendent talks first 100 days, dives into district data

Business

‘It was an answer to a call:’ TenderHearted Home Care celebrates 10 years of providing care at home

News

Political Notebook: Local polls find increasing number of North Carolinians want COVID-19 vaccine

News

Trial begins on challenge to latest NC voter ID law

Local

Burch, Fisher, Marsh honored as 2021 recipients of Elizabeth Duncan Koontz Humanitarian Award

Landis

Landis board talks revenues, budget planning, department updates

College

College baseball: Catawba rolls 7-1 and 24-1

Nation/World

Student fires at officers at Tennessee school, is killed

Nation/World

Police: Minnesota officer meant to draw Taser, not handgun

Crime

Man receives consecutive prison sentences for sex offenses