• 39°

Watch out for boxelder bugs

By Darrell Blackwelder
For the Salisbury Post
Boxelder bugs have already emerged, causing problems after only a few days of warm weather. This insect is a menace, emerging in the fall and now in early spring, congregating on sides of homes. Many people are complaining that the insects are invading their homes, causing problems.
The insect is attracted to the seed of boxelder trees. Boxelders are actually maples found growing on roadsides and ditch banks. However, the bug also feeds on other hardwood trees.
Although boxelder bugs are associated with pests of shade trees, this insect it is considered more of a household pest. They do not bite people or harm goods, but their presence is clearly a nuisance. On warm winter days, the insects become active, moving in and on buildings, causing concern for homeowners.
Adult boxelder bugs are now emerging from their winter shelters to feed for a couple of weeks before mating. These insects prefer sunny areas and are found most abundantly on trees in a southern exposure and on sides of buildings facing south. The bug is attracted to light or pastel colors of siding or trim work.
The female boxelder deposits about 230 eggs in cracks and crevices of boxelder and other trees. The eggs normally hatch in about two weeks. The insect will amass large populations in July to early September because of two generations each season. The insects often move indoors in September and October searching for a place to overwinter.
These insects can easily move indoors, especially in older homes that are not properly sealed. Boxelder bugs are easily swept up or vacuumed up. If pesticide application is preferred, a number of pesticides are available for indoors. These include Bayer Advanced, Ortho Home Defense and Spectracide Bug Stop.
Outdoor pesticide labeled for boxelder bugs may be sprayed around windows and doors to reduce the number of bugs entering the home. Always follow the label before applying any pesticide material.
Darrell Blackwelder is an agricultural agent in charge of horticulture with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service in Rowan County.

Comments

Comments closed.

Coronavirus

10% of Rowan residents receive first dose; eight COVID-19 deaths reported this week

News

North Carolina State Highway Patrol commander to retire

Education

UNC School of the Arts may go for online learning due to COVID-19 spread

Coronavirus

Greensboro site to administer 3,000 daily vaccine doses starting March 10

Nation/World

$1.9 billion relief bill closer to passage in House

Nation/World

Lady Gaga’s dogs recovered safely

Coronavirus

Advisers OK single-shot COVID-19 vaccine from J&J

Local

Post wins 18 N.C. Press Association Awards

Education

Cooper vetoes bill that would force K-12 schools to reopen

Local

Lanning named Spencer’s fire chief

Crime

Blotter: Feb. 26

Crime

Salisbury, Kannapolis men charged with soliciting sexual acts

News

Racial bias ‘deeply entrenched’ in report critical of Apex Police Department

Nation/World

US bombs facilities in Syria used by Iran-backed militia

Elections

City council again dismisses idea of adding new member, focus now on recommendation to delay elections

Business

‘Let’s make some money:’ Loosened restrictions praised by bar owners, baseball team

High School

Salisbury High bucks historical trend in dominant shutout of West Rowan

Enochville

Garage declared total loss after Enochville fire

Crime

Cooper, N.C. prison officials agree to release 3,500 inmates

Coronavirus

Two more COVID-19 deaths reported in Rowan, six for the week

Crime

Blotter: Man brandishes AR-15, runs over motorcycle at Rockwell-area gas station

Crime

Salisbury man charged with exploitation of minor

Crime

Road rage incident results in assault charges

Local

Dukeville lead testing results trickle in, more participation needed