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Letters: Ad response gives reality check on local economy

Ad response gives
a reality check
on local economy
In this election season some of the candidates for various offices indicate that the U.S. economy is basically sound. However, this week I was given a significant reality check regarding the economy of Rowan County. On Sept. 9, I placed an ad in the Salisbury Post indicating I had a part-time job available, lasting approximately six to eight weeks. Within 72 hours, I had received more than 100 responses, some from as far away as Kannapolis and Winston-Salem. A few of the applicants were quite insistent in trying to schedule an interview. At that time, I had no choice but to stop taking further calls.
As I thought about the number of responses I had received for this little job, I was struck by the difficult or, worse yet, desperate circumstances in which many people in this area must find themselves. If the economy is basically sound, then why are more than 100 people in Rowan County looking for a short-term part-time job?
For me, this is a strong indicator as to why the economy is issue No. 1 for so many voters this election season. I strongly implore all registered voters to get out and vote their conscience this year in support of whichever candidates at any level they feel will be able to create an environment that will help stimulate our economy, therefore enabling more of our hard-working citizens and their families to get ahead.
ó Donald Doering
Salisbury
Property owners just want to be left in peace
West Rowan, East Rowan, North Rowan or South Rowan ó what’s the difference? Why have the landowners of western Rowan been picked on by our local government to be restricted or regulated?
Many of the landowners of western Rowan have property that has been family-owned for 100 years or more. They have held this land as an investment and as their heritage, often so that their heirs might be able to determine its best use at a later date. Up until now, these property owners have been good stewards of their property. Are we now to believe that all of the people have instantly become stupid and incapable of handling their affairs and their assets?
All we ask is that you leave us alone. We have been good citizens up until now. Why would we change? We, or our families, have maintained this property and paid our taxes as our county has presented our tax obligations to us, so this land is ours!
Those of you who own stock in any company do not want the government telling you when and to whom you must or must not be able to sell your stock, nor why or at what price. We feel the same way about our land. Leave us alone!
ó William E. Myers
Woodleaf
Leaders need
to deal with everyday issues
This letter is in response to a direct quote made by Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain on CNN Thursday (Sept. 11). Questioned whether being a small-town mayor was less important than a community organizer, his response was that being a small-town mayor was the hardest job in the country.
He also stated that it was harder than his job of going to Washington, where he did not have to deal with the day-to-day problems of people. While I respect that the candidates have been campaigning for quite some time and are likely quite tired, don’t we want our elected officials in our town and in Washington wanting to “deal” with the problems of people? After all, the day-to-day problems of people are the issues that change the course of our country.
Also, if the Republican ticket is ready “on day one” to lead us in these difficult times with the foreign problems we are facing, would we not want our vice president to have at least traveled to other countries and have some knowledge regarding their policies and principles? According to Bay Buchannon, a Republican strategist, Sarah Palin is a “real” person who cares about what the people in this country are thinking (not McCain, clearly), and do we really need another person who is only paying attention to facts and figures?
Personally, I want my elected officials to be concerned about our day-to-day struggles and have some grasp of facts on which to base their decisions. These are difficult times, to be certain.
Having elected officials who have greater knowledge than me and have experience with people from other countries and cultures seems vital to our success as a nation.
Being confident is great, but you can be confident and wrong.
ó Amy Welch
Salisbury
To fight obesity, turn off the games and go outside
I am commenting on the subject of overweight children. Reportedly, the main factor in obesity is certain foods that children eat. I disagree with that theory because I have noticed other factors.
Children spent entirely too much time indoors or just sitting on their behinds with their noses stuck into computers, televisions, video games, cell phones and other items that don’t contribute to exercise.
Children should be outdoors on good-weather days, getting exercise by playing ball, jumping rope, bicycling or similar activities.
Another factor is that many parents push their children around in baby strollers almost to the age of 5. If a child has a medical condition and is physically unable to walk, then it would be understandable for the parents to be pushing the child around instead of letting him or her walk.
However, if children have two good strong feet and legs to walk with, then they need to be allowed to do so.
Parents need to insist that their children get outdoors for daily exercise and fresh air instead of encouraging them to become lazy, obese children.
Taking recess time out of schools would be a mistake as well. Children need recess so they can get some exercise and fresh air. It also helps prevent them from becoming bored in their classrooms.
God created most human beings with movable strong legs and feet so they can have the opportunity to run, walk, hop, skip and stand.
ó Ellie Mae Lambert
Salisbury

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