• 55°

Darts and laurels

Laurels in the progress toward a new central office for the Rowan-Salisbury Schools. Arnold Chamberlain, chairman of the board of commissioners, has spearheaded talks between the two boards in recent weeks about financing a new headquarters. The boards might split payments on a $10 million project 50-50. This is good news. Previously, commissioners seemed to consider a new central office an extravagance. Then they visited the buildings that house school offices, which are old and outdated. The safety of the building on North Long Street, in particular, is in doubt.The system has thrown good money after bad in that spot for far too long. It’s unfortunate that commissioners didn’t open their eyes to this need sooner. Chamberlain goes off the board in December, and the other commissioner involved in the process, Jim Sides, is a candidate this fall. An 11th hour conversion is better than no conversion, but the schools need supporters who can deliver after 2008.
– – –
Dart to the inevitable tradeoff that comes with the growing popularity of more fuel-efficient cars. The price of those little cars is going up. For that you can thank our good friends, Supply and Demand, but that’s not the only priciple at work here. So is the need to make up for lost profits. USA Today reports automakers are raising prices on small cars to regain profits lost when truck and SUV sales plummeted. Part of the increase will be justified by extra features on new cars, such as navigation systems and leather seats. Cars that have been priced in the teens will climb beyond $25,000. People who have been paying more than $30,000 for gas-guzzling SUVs won’t flinch at that. But there will be more increases to come as the federal government finalizes rules requiring automakers to raise the gas efficiency of their products. Consumers will pay, one way or the other. Somehow, paying in a way that does not benefit the oil companies as much ó and that hurts the enviroment less ó softens the blow.
– – –
Laurels to the swift evacuation of New Orleans and other cities along the Gulf Coast as Hurricane Gustav neared last weekend. Fortunately, the storm was not as destructive as feared, and some people might even consider the evacuation unwarranted, in hindsight. But this year’s evacuees by and large are not so young that they have forgotten Hurricane Katrina. People who escaped floodwaters by climbing on roofs, or who lost loved ones or otherwise suffered will not soon forget. Hours spent in slow-moving evacuation traffic and the inconvenience of temporary displacement are nothing compared to the horrors of that day in 2005. As for the chaos that followed, the Bush Administration and FEMA also learned lessons from Katrina. When hurricane victims’ needs were the greatest in 2005, the federal government’s attentiveness was at its worst. That also will stick in people’s memories for a long time.

Comments

Comments closed.

Local

Dukeville lead testing results trickle in, more participation needed

Education

Faith Academy interviewing staff, preparing site for fall opening

News

Volunteers work around obstacles, alter procedures to offer free tax services to those in need

Education

Education shoutouts

Local

Retired Marine gets recognition for toy collection efforts

Local

March issue of Salisbury the Magazine is now available

Education

Five get Dunbar School Heritage Scholarships

Education

Education briefs: Salisbury Academy fourth-graders think big as inventors

Education

Bakari Sellers keynote speaker at Livingstone College Founder’s Day program

Nation/World

Biden aims to distribute masks to millions in ‘equity’ push

Nation/World

Chief: Capitol Police were warned of violence before riot

Nation/World

GOP rallies solidly against Democrats’ virus relief package

Nation/World

FDA says single-dose shot from Johnson & Johnson prevents severe COVID

High School

Coaches, lawmakers react to governor’s order expanding sporting event capacity

Coronavirus

Three new COVID-19 deaths, positives remain below triple digits

BREAKING NEWS

Gov. Cooper announces end to curfew, changes to restrictions affecting bars, high school sports

Crime

Blotter: Two charged after call about package

Crime

Salisbury Police investigating two shootings

Crime

Chase involving Kernersville man ends in woods behind Carson High School

News Main

North Rowan girls end season with playoff loss to Murphy

Education

Rowan-Salisbury EC department plunges in place after raising $1,300 for Special Olympics

Nation/World

Tiger Woods injured in car crash, has surgery on legs

Local

Local stakeholders set goals, direction to tackle city’s housing issues

Education

RSS board talks future of Henderson Independent School