• 55°

Editorial: Let's keep it moving, folks

Most of us appreciate the service that firefighters and other public safety workers perform for the community every day. It’s stressful, dangerous work where seconds can mean the difference between deliverance and disaster.
So why do we make their jobs harder and put them at even greater risk by treating fire and accident scenes as if they’re simply another reality show designed for our personal entertainment?
Case in point: When fire erupted at a house off N.C. 150 just outside the Salisbury city limits last Saturday, firefighters said their access to the scene was impeded by the number of gawkers who drove into the neighborhood trying to get a better look at the fire. As a result, tanker trucks were delayed in reaching the scene, and the destruction was greater than it might have been had firefighters had unfettered access. Granted, the fact that the house was on a deadend street may also have complicated the logistics, but there’s simply no excuse for motorists to ignore common-sense safety precautions and flock to the scene of a fire or accident. In this case, fortunately, the fire involved loss of property, not harm to life. But if someone had been seriously injured or a firefighter had collapsed at the scene, the gawkers clogging the roads could just as easily have delayed medical treatment for the seconds or minutes that can make a life-saving difference.
Protecting the lives of our public safety workers is an ongoing challenge, and it’s one in which we all have a responsibility to show concern for others. A few years ago, because of concerns about the safety of officers and emergency responders at accident scenes, the state enacted a “Move Over” law that requires motorists to change lanes or slow down when passing a stopped emergency vehicle with flashing lights on the roadside. To help our public safety workers work as efficiently and safely as possible, however, it’s not enough just to move over; motorists in the vicinity of fires or accidents also need to keep moving on.

Comments

Comments closed.

Nation/World

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop’s trial in Floyd death

Nation/World

Officer accused of force in stop of Black Army officer fired

Crime

Blotter: Man charged with hitting man with car, fleeing while intoxicated

Local

‘Meet the need’: Rowan County Health Department looks to add to vaccination options

Local

Seaford is first woman in county hired for town manager position since the ’90s

Local

Colonial Spring Frolic makes a comeback to kick off museum’s year

Local

Concord City Council wants to name bridge for fallen officer, Rowan native

Education

RSS administration will recommend selling Faith Elementary property to charter school

Business

Inspired by advice from father-in-law, Angela Mills launches her own business in memory of him

Local

Rowan County Democrats re-elect leaders, pass resolutions

Local

Baseball: Memories come alive in Ferebee book

Local

During Child Abuse Prevention Month, professionals reflect on detecting abuse in a virtual world

Business

Biz Roundup: Small Business Center announces spring slate of workshop for business owners

Clubs

Kiwanis Pancake Festival starts Friday

Local

Rowan fire marshal seeks to clear up confusion, worry caused by solicitation letter

Education

Fun every day: Fifth anniversary for Yadkin Path Montessori School

Nation/World

Charles: Royal family ‘deeply grateful’ for support for Philip

News

North Carolina sites to resume J&J vaccines after CDC review

News

Cooper OKs bill offering K-12 students summer school option

High School

High school football: Playoff time means get ready for ‘big-boy football’

High School

High school football: Hornets overpower South to secure playoff spot

Crime

Jeffrey MacDonald won’t be released despite deteriorating health

Business

Amazon warehouse workers reject union in Alabama

Nation/World

Ex-NFL player’s brain to be probed for trauma-related harm after Rock Hill shootings