• 66°

Editorial: High food prices taking a toll

The United States isn’t seeing the food riots that have erupted in Haiti, Malaysia, Afghanistan and more than a dozen other counties around the globe. But record high food prices are having an impact here as well, especially among those who were already struggling to make ends meet.
Confronted with the possibility of $4-a-gallon gasoline, people may find ways to drive less and walk more. But how are struggling families supposed to cope with $4-a-gallon milk, along with surging costs for other basic staples, coupled with increases in utility bills and medical care? A lot of people are having a tough time, and many of them are here in Rowan County. At Rowan Helping Ministries, for instance, the food pantry has seen a significant increase in the number of people requesting food assistance. One a recent Monday, 75 families sought help, up from the 40-45 daily requests that were coming in previously.
This Saturday, you can help make sure the pantry shelves stay stocked by participating in the National Association of Letter Carriers’ “Stamp Out Hunger!” food drive. This annual nationwide event is the largest single-day food drive in the country, and organizers say it is especially important this year to collect as much food as possible. Locally, the drive is sponsored by NALC Branch 934, and here’s how it works:
If you have a Salisbury, Spencer or China Grove address, leave a sturdy bag containing nonperishable foods at your mailbox before Saturday’s regular mail delivery. Customers with rural boxes should leave the bag inside the box or hang it from the side, if possible. Food pantries can use a variety of packaged nonperishable items such as pasta, rice, macaroni, peanut butter, jelly, canned meats, soup, vegetables and cereal.
After collecting the donations, mail carriers and volunteers will deliver the bounty to Rowan Helping Ministries, the Salvation Army and Main Street Missions in China Grove.
During last year’s drive, donations were down 6,000 pounds from the 20,000 pounds collected in 2006. Organizers hope to reverse that decline and make this a record year for the drive. With enough people’s help, they should be able to deliver on that goal.

Comments

Comments closed.

Crime

Blotter: Man faces sexual exploitation charge for images on Instagram

News

Defendant convicted in attempted murder case on the run after fleeing from trial

Business

Downtown Gateway Building to be renamed for late Paul Fisher

Coronavirus

Rowan County COVID-19 data for April 15

Local

Rep. Warren’s bill would prohibit parking in electric vehicle charging stations

Local

Historic Preservation Commission approves Integro Technologies expansion, Paint the Pavement project

Education

Faith Academy, RSS will negotiate over what goes, stays in elementary school

Crime

Teacher killed in Alamance County shootout with Mexican drug cartel

Coronavirus

Bill would give more tax breaks on COVID-19 loans

Nation/World

No response as divers knock on capsized ship’s hull

Local

Quotes of the week

Crime

Blotter: Man found on church property with litany of drugs

Crime

Man charged in connection to 2019 overdose death

Business

‘It’s our big time’: Salisbury Farmers Market reopens Saturday

Education

Schools capital funding still frozen as RSS sends local budget to county

Business

Shields, Cheerwine Festival receive N.C. Main Street Awards

Kannapolis

Duke University launches kidney disease study in Kannapolis for people of African descent

Education

Horizons Unlimited will hold in-person summer camps

Education

Education briefs: Catawba planning for more in-person activities, free summer school tuition

Coronavirus

County’s full COVID-19 vaccinations top 22,600

High School

High school golf: With Merrell, Mustangs back on top

Local

Spencer investigating rat problem on South Iredell Street

News

Livingstone, Mission House Church to host national ‘Black Voters Matter’ listening session

Education

Shoutouts