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Letters to the editor – Tuesday (4-22-08)

Horses could help city rein in spending
The city of Salisbury is always trying to raise additional revenue. I hope city officials understand that reducing costs will have the same result. One method to reduce costs is available to the Police Department. Instead of buying police cars, I suggest they purchase police horses. Horses cost much less than cars, and the horses don’t burn gasoline. Several farmers have told me hay is much cheaper than gasoline. These horse patrols could be used in downtown Salisbury, where much of the crime is committed. I know what you are thinking. Well, the Europeans are one step ahead of us. When visiting Brugge, Belgium, last year, I noticed they used a special collection device at the rear of the horse. This device eliminated the need for a pooper scooper. Perhaps the City Council could appoint a special committee to devise a method of emptying the pooper holder.
Just think ó Salisbury might make the national evening news by showing a policeman galloping down the street with his pistol blazing in chase of a burglary suspect while the “Lone Ranger” theme played from loud speakers. To offset the price of hay, the City Council could appoint another special committee to give horse rides to any citizen for maybe $10 on the horse’s day off. Instead of the horse costing the Police Department, the horse might even generate revenue. Another committee could study the possibility of accumulating the poop and converting it to methane gas to heat City Hall in the winter. The horse patrols would even highlight the historic Salisbury theme and attract more visitors to the city.
With increased revenue, the City Council could consider giving the city manager a mid-year salary increase. Perhaps then the city leaders could abandon their annexation attempts due to additional revenues and cost reductions.
ó Louis D. Smith
Salisbury
A perilous path
Unfortunately, the people of the United States seem to be suffering from a major loss of memory. Please forgive me for mentioning a few past events.
Do you remember the words “Travelgate,” or “Whitewater?” Somehow, missing records from the Rose Law firm showed up in a closet at the White House.
A lady earned windfall profits from insider information on trading in cattle futures and then failed to tell the truth about the matter. Martha Stewart went to prison for a similar situation.
Do the names Jennifer Flowers, Paula Jones and Monica Lewinsky ring a bell?
How about, “I did not have sexual relations with that woman…”? Is perjury still a crime in this country? There were impeachment proceedings and a “Wag-the-Dog” bombing of a pharmaceutical factory. Most recently, there was a report on landing at an airport in Bosnia under sniper fire that never existed.
The old saying that you can tell politicians are lying because their lips are moving was never truer.
If you are thinking, well, the present administration has not been perfect either, you would certainly be correct. I am not trying to bash one political party.
However, in a great nation such as ours, surely we can come up with some better candidates for president of the United States.
If we send those two back to the White House it will prove that our nation’s moral compass is pointing backwards.
We should look to the history of the Roman Republic to find the fate of our nation if we continue down this path.
ó Joe D. Teeter
Gold Hill
Early voting event
This Thursday, students and faculty members from Livingstone and Catawba College will march together to the board of elections to take part in early voting. As Catawba students, we are excited to celebrate with Livingstone our right to vote, and glad to be invited by them to this march. We now want to extend the invitation to the broader community. The march will begin at 10 a.m.; please join us at the Board of Elections and help us Get Out The Vote.
ó Lilli Blackmore, Adam Peeler and Tom Sharp
Salisbury

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