• 64°

Baseball: Owners, players agree

By Ronald Blum
Associated Press
NEW YORK ó Baseball players and owners toughened their drug rules again Friday in response to outside criticism, agreeing to more frequent testing and increased ó but not total ó authority for the program’s outside administrator.
All players implicated in December’s Mitchell Report on performance-enhancing drugs were given amnesty as part of the agreement, the third major modification since the program was instituted in 2002 following accusations players were abusing steroids.
“It is time for the game to move forward,” commissioner Bud Selig said. “There is little to be gained at this point in debating dated misconduct and enduring numerous disciplinary proceedings.”
Thus, the deal eliminated 15-day suspensions assessed against Jose Guillen and Jay Gibbons.
Friday’s agreement also ensures there will never be another Mitchell Report, as both sides agreed to keep players’ names private until discipline is imposed in any future probe. The sides also agreed a player would be given any allegations and evidence against him before any investigatory interview.
Many players, including seven-time Cy Young Award winner Roger Clemens, complained Mitchell never disclosed the case against them until the report was released.
Talks to amend the drug agreement were prompted by the Mitchell Report’s scandalous allegations, including those by Brian McNamee, the former personal trainer who testified under oath that he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone.
Mitchell made many recommendations that Major League Baseball adopted unilaterally, and Friday’s agreement covered the changes subject to collecting bargaining. In the deal, baseball will impose certification standards for strength and conditioning coaches starting next year.
Baseball, however, did not heed advice from the World Anti-Doping Agency to turn over testing to an outside agency.
Instead, the Independent Program Administrator, a position created in November 2005, will be given an initial three-year term and can be removed only if an arbitrator finds cause. Until now, he could be fired at any time by either side.

Comments

Comments closed.

High School

High school football: Playoff time means get ready for ‘big-boy football’

High School

High school football: Hornets overpower South to secure playoff spot

Crime

Jeffrey MacDonald won’t be released despite deteriorating health

Business

Amazon warehouse workers reject union in Alabama

Nation/World

Ex-NFL player’s brain to be probed for trauma-related harm after Rock Hill shootings

Education

Duke University to require COVID vaccinations for fall term

Education

Cooper OKs bill offering K-12 students summer school option

High School

High school football: Record night for Pinckney as East cruises; Carson wins thriller in OT

Nation/World

D-Day survivor, WWII torch bearer Ray Lambert dies at 100

Nation/World

Prince Philip was always defined by role as husband of British queen

China Grove

One dead, several injured after head-on collision in China Grove

Crime

Man, woman charged for selling drugs to undercover deputies

Crime

Blotter: Rowan County man charged with indecent liberties with children

Local

Spencer town board gets look at Park Plaza progress

Business

‘Applicant market’: Unemployment rate improving as businesses hire more workers

Local

National, local business leaders praise Salisbury’s initiative to support Black-owned operations

Nation/World

Tillis has prostate cancer surgery

Coronavirus

Adverse reactions surface from Johnson & Johnson vaccine

Nation/World

Expert: Lack of oxygen killed George Floyd, not drugs

Local

Quotes of the week

Nation/World

Biden seeks crackdown on homemade firearms

Nation/World

Victim of former NFL player’s rampage wrote of faith, life’s fragility

News

Wrongly imprisoned man gets $750,000

High School

West falls to Statesville, finishes second in NPC