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Letters to the editor – Saturday (4-12-08)

Maybe the commission race
has too many candidates
I attended the county commission candidates debate at Catawba College. It seems that all candidates are sincere in their desire to help Rowan County.
Of the 13 folks, in my opinion, seven were electable. That means they were able to communicate well enough to get their ideas across and possibly create some positive change. Unfortunately, that leaves six folks who may work hard and have good intentions, but they just did not communicate to me. It could be they did not prepare or they had an off night, but these folks are vying for a position whose job is to listen and then act … of which much of the actions require communicating.
So, citizens of Rowan County, without taking the time to talk and/or listen to our candidates, we have just barely over a 50 percent chance of getting it right. Party leaders, don’t you have a responsibility of having your party well represented? Maybe you can ask some of these folks to withdraw before May 6.
ó Bob Oswald
Spencer
Legion event spreads smiles About this time every year, a special event takes place at Harold B. Jarrett American Legion Post. It’s a tradition that doesn’t make headlines, but it does make for some wonderful memories. Every spring, students in Exceptional Children’s classes are treated to a celebration in their honor. They get to see a magic show or a puppet show, eat “Pinkie dogs” and go on an egg hunt.
I’m not sure when it started, but I’ve been taking my students since 1984. They also invite us at Christmas and present each child with a gift from Santa. I wish you could see the joy on the children’s faces. We all leave with a big smile and a full heart. I am reminded that these are the people who fought for our right to be able to freely celebrate these special occasions. These men and women gave to our country and continue to give to our community.
Thank you to all members of the Harold B. Jarrett American Legion Post.
ó Jtan W. Whisenant
Salisbury
Jtan Whisenant teaches Exceptional Children at Southeast Middle School.
Remembering a special person
As a young boy growing up in Salisbury, I was blessed to have several family friends who were a true inspiration and blessing to me. When I was a teenager, my mother died from a very debilitating and non-curable circulatory disease called scleroderma. My sister, Judy, was already in college when our mother died. Thus my father did the very best he could to raise me, and I will forever be grateful for his dedication and loving support.
God puts special people in our lives and one of those sweet-spirited servants of His was a dear lady named Margaret Misenheimer. Her son Steve was a childhood friend of mine. He now lives here in Knoxville and is the pastor of St. Johns Lutheran Church. I remember very fondly the care and concern Mrs. Misenheimer had for me. She often invited me to stay for dinner and was always extremely kind to me. Steve’s father, Pastor Ernest Misenheimer, was a dear man and very inspirational and encouraging to me as well.
God called his servant Margaret Misenheimer home on April 5. Her dear husband awaits her there. Sometimes you can never say “thank you” that one last time on this side of heaven. But one day we will be able to rejoin our dear friends and loved ones, and at that special moment we can say to those sweet spirited souls who held such a cherished place in our lives: “Thank you for your kindness and love.”
ó Emmette G. Thompson III
Knoxville, Tenn
An unwelcoming eventSeveral hundred of us were “welcomed” to the sacred halls of Salisbury’s City Council on Tuesday in order that we might have our say about being forcibly annexed. Of course, the timing for the meeting was terrible. Lots of folks were still at work, and the council chamber was way too small to accommodate all of those who wished to speak; and those who did not want to sit out in the “suburbs” of the Civic Center, where they could watch it all on closed circuit television but have no say at all, got to stand outside of City Hall and wait to be permitted to enter ó by the back door yet ó when someone came out and made room for them.
What was perhaps the most offensive thing of all was the mayor’s introduction of herself to the very peaceful and generally gregarious crowd that had gotten there in time to get in before the police shut the door. She told us in no uncertain terms that she was running the meeting and that if anybody misbehaved, she would have them thrown out. This was the first time that some of us (probably most of us) have ever seen the mayor, who is, I’m sure, a lovely lady, by all reports. But to a crowd of people who were being extraordinarily well behaved, she came off like a commandant in a reform school. It was an ugly performance, and for many of us, this was our first exposure to the leaders of Salisbury. It was not pretty.
I cannot imagine why anyone would want to be part of a city that is led in this fashion. It reeks of bad manners and bad management. I know that I certainly don’t want to become a part of a city whose leaders treat people like this.
ó Stephen A. Moss
Salisbury
Our valuable Rowan neighbors
For anyone to suggest that our neighbors in Rowan County are leaching off Salisbury citizens is laughable and offensive. Many of us chose to live in Salisbury where others prefer to live in the county. Some, not all, shop in our stores, buy gas, own businesses, volunteer and provide valuable services to our city and citizens. Perhaps they should charge us for their services (just a thought).
For any city official or citizen to demean the contribution of our neighbors is deplorable. The forced annexation agenda is just not right. Perhaps I should be able to balance my personal budget by taking money from my next door neighbor without their permission. … That’s right, I can’t. … It’s called stealing.
I’m a citizen of Salisbury and I apologize to the county residents for how you’ve been treated. Das vidania, comrades!
ó Rod Whedbee
Salisbury
.
Endorsement letters
Letters commenting on candidates in the May 6 primary should be limited to 150 words and must be received in the Salisbury Post newsroom by 5 p.m. April 30.

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