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Letters to the editor 4-7-08

VA center expands vision programs
Regarding the March 20 letter “Help for Veterans”:
Thank you, Greta Lint, for your kind words. I work for the VA and have been working with visually impaired veterans for a number of years. I would like to explain a little about the VA’s system.
People who have vision problems have different symptoms and needs. Someone like Ms. Lint’s father with macular degeneration might have trouble reading and recognizing people. Someone with glaucoma might bump into obstacles such as doorways. There is a Visual Impairment Service Team (VIST) coordinator at every VA to help visually impaired veterans get into the system and understand the options they may have. David Hedrick is the VIST coordinator in the Salisbury VA System. Working through paperwork is never easy. David Hedrick can help.
I am proud to write that the VA has just expanded its VIST and Low Vision Clinic programs so that veterans can now get more services locally. These new local programs are designed to offer a “continuum of care” and are to be in place by the end of September. Veterans with low vision or blindness can also go to a VA Blind Rehab Center like the one at the VA Medical Center in Augusta, Ga., where Ms. Lint’s father participated. David Hedrick will help veterans understand the differences between these services, determine which is best suited for each person’s needs and help veterans make the arrangements to attend the program they believe will be most helpful. The Salisbury VA also has a Vision Rehab Research Lab that offers opportunities for veterans to participate in research ideas that will help visually impaired veterans. Veterans may be referred to the Low Vision Clinic by their VA primary care provider. They may contact David Hedrick at 336-768-3296, extension 1483, or e-mail david.hedrick@va.gov.
ó Gary Mancil
Gary Mancil is the chief of Optometry Service at Hefner VA Medical Center.
At least the driver might have stoppedA traumatic event unfolded near Mount Hope Church and Blackwelder Road around 10 p.m. Wednesday, and I don’t know who’s responsible. Our daughter and I had walked outside. Kristen raises miniature Dachshunds. She released them from their day lot, as she typically does, to let them play and exercise before returning them to their indoor kennels for the evening. Typically, they never go toward the paved highway, as our home is situated more than 100 yards off the road. However, this evening was different. As I was standing near the pasture fence, four of her dogs ran past me. They disappeared, and I thought they were headed to their nighttime quarters. Then suddenly I heard one or more yelps. I looked toward Mount Hope Church Road and saw a southbound vehicle slow and pull into Blackwelder Road. It sat there until I ran out to the highway. Since I carried a flashlight that was shining in their direction, the driver could not have helped but notice me, and knew we could use some help.
I found Peanut lying in the southbound lane with injuries to her right side. We rescued her from the highway and my wife and daughter tended her injuries. We then accounted for all the other dogs except Brownie. We looked for her until almost midnight. At 5 a.m., Brownie was standing out by our backdoor. She appeared to be uninjured; then I noticed she was dragging her right back leg. We took them to the veterinarian. Regretfully, both had to be put to sleep.
It was dark, and these were small animals. The driver probably didn’t see them until it was too late. However, the driver showed no concern or consideration. You could have at least stopped and said, “I’m sorry.” Even though we don’t know your identity, you’re forgiven.
ó Virgil L. Misenheimer
Salisbury
Business shutdown is a loss for Faith
It has recently come to my attention that the town of Faith seems be looking for something to do in its “down time.”
It appears the town “fathers” are harassing a small, female-owned business that just so happens to be run from a converted, attached garage. This female-owned business is situated less than a mile from two other home-operated businesses. The female-owned business is being threatened with extinction due to “complaints” from surrounding neighbors.
This business has been in operation from this site for more than six years. Now, may I please ask who would complain about several autos that simply sit in a driveway all day. The only traffic is the occasional Fed-Ex, DSL or other delivery vehicle that may arrive during any given workday.
The shutdown will push three individuals into unemployment. Isn’t there enough unemployment in the area without this ridiculous harassment from the local government?
What is the real reason for this action? What is the real motive? What is the real agenda of the town of Faith in harassing this business?
Let them alone. Let them produce something positive for the area. Town fathers, get a life.
ó Brenda H. McDonald
Charlotte

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