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Letters to the editor

If cities annex, why can’t counties and state?
Salisbury and other cities make the argument that they must use forced annexation in order to grow. Let me ask: Must Rowan County annex surrounding counties in order to grow? Must North Carolina annex surrounding states in order to grow? Clearly the answer to both questions is “no.”
Both Rowan County and our state will grow by effectively and efficiently governing within their current borders. Salisbury can and should do the same.
The current annexation law should be changed because it tramples on the rights of North Carolina citizens. It subjects us to taxation without representation. It allows cities like Salisbury to force themselves upon us. We county residents outside the cities can not vote for the city councils that impose on us heavy taxes and fees that could run as high as $10,000 when utilities are connected. On the state level, we have the right to vote for those making the laws that affect us. We should have the right on the local level to vote on annexation, separate from the city, before being annexed.
Once slavery was legal in our state, but slavery was wrong. Once segregation was legal in our state, but segregation was wrong. We changed those two laws that were wrong. Currently forced annexation is legal in our state. Being legal does not make it right.
Just as we have changed the other oppressive laws that were wrong, we should do the same to the current annexation law.
Please consider contacting our legislative delegation of House members Fred Steen and Lorene Coates and state Sen. Andrew Brock and ask them to support major changes in this oppressive annexation law.
ó Larry Wright
Salisbury
It’s fair and time for it
The residents of the subdivisions found on N.C. 150 enjoy the benefits of living adjacent to a healthy, vibrant town without bearing a share of the cost of maintaining the town.
If asked the name of the town where they live, most proudly will respond “Salisbury.” I believe that these residents should share in the tax burden of maintaining the town infrastructure and that the proposed annexation is fair and perhaps overdue.
ó Doug Sokolowski
Salisbury

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