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letters to the editor

Just because it’s legal, it isn’t right
As Trent Allman pointed out in Monday’s letters section, Salisbury’s figures on annexation just don’t make sense, even after city leaders have used all possible spin to make them appear reasonable. They attempt to justify their position by bringing in or quoting their cronies from the same mold as they, e.g. other mayors, etc. Talk about the fox guarding the hen house.
The fact is the cost for services that Salisbury is committing to will far exceed the additional revenue the annexation will provide. The only way possible for the city to pay for these costs will be to increase the taxes of all city residents. Current residents, contact your city council members and speak up before it is too late.
Vance Meek further pointed out the hypocrisy of city officials who contend the city is using “fair” and “proper procedures” and “state law” to justify its position. Just because something is law does not make it fair, e.g. there was a time when law said that some citizens had to sit in the back of buses, could not eat in some restaurants, etc. Was that fair? There is a higher law, the law of “right.” Obviously, current city leaders have neither the character nor the integrity to address that. Rather, they choose to conform to standard bureaucratic tactics for some unknown reason, perhaps to further their own political ambitions.
Some have ludicrously suggested our county commissioners are opposed to the annexation because one lives in the annexation area. The real reason is the county will lose over $200,000 in revenues immediately, and much more (around $500,000 annually) after the airport completes current plans. Rowan County citizens will make up this lost revenue in the form of higher county taxes. All county citizens need to voice their objections to this annexation.
ó James R. Smith
Salisbury
The word is ‘no’
We like our neighborhood. We have our own water, sewer and garbage pickup.
We say “no” to forced annexation!
ó Charlie & Mary Snowberger
Salisbury
Help for veterans
Are you a blind veteran? If so, there may be help for you from the Veterans Administration. My dad, who saw combat during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, recently had a wonderful experience at the VA hospital in Augusta,Ga., where he will be continuing to learn how to use new appliances and equipment that have been designed specifically for people with low light vision ó the kind resulting from macular degeneration. We never hear really good news about the VA. So that’s why I’m writing this letter.
He was there, along with 15 other people, for a little more than a month. Each had individual training on such things as how to sign their name (it’s not as easy as you think if you’re unable to see), learning to read and write all over again, watch TV and even be able to tell time ó all with the aid of new appliances, gadgets and equipment that is given to vets. Yes, given. Now that he’s in “the system,” he’ll be able to return to learn about more items as they become available.
With March being Macular Degeneration Month, I encourage blind veterans to inquire about facilities in Augusta, Birmingham, Charleston and even San Francisco, where blind rehab units have been established. My dad said, “This facility is like a brand new Mayo Clinic.” He explained that the staff and doctors are blind, many using seeing eye dogs. Even the barber is blind ó and he does a good job!
Along the way, we’ve learned that (1) not all doctors know how to test for macular degeneration, (2) it can start when you’re in your late 40s and (3) it’s hereditary. So, go get checked out, establish a Google alert on your e-mail for macular degeneration and share this letter with a veteran.
ó Greta Anita Lint
Asheboro

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