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letters to the editor

Huckabee comments
are disturbing
I have not been able to erase from my mind a recent statement made by Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee. In addressing a crowd of supporters on the issues of abortion and gay marriage, he indicated that it was easier to change the United States Constitution that it is to change the word of God.
I find this comment disturbing for a couple of reasons. First of all, I do not believe this to be true. The rules and requirements for amending the Constitution seem to be much more complicated and rigorous (proposal by two-thirds of both houses of Congress or state legislatures and ratified by three-fourths of the states, and so on), compared to an agreement among a gathering of religion leaders, the whim of a king or the interpretation of ancient scrolls across many languages (all part of the route to the modern Bible). Secondly, all those who enjoy the freedom and protection provided by our constitutional republic should find candidate Huckabee’s comment frightening.
Using one’s beliefs as a guide for decision making is natural. However, our local, state, and national leaders are beholden to their respective constitutions, not to the Bible, the Koran or the Talmud. There are only small steps between fundamentalism and extremism. In a Huckabee-led United States, we might not only find that our leaders are spending valuable time and resources in efforts to amend the Constitution to restrict rights according to gender, race and sexual orientation, but to eliminate barbecue pork and fishing on Sundays as well.
ó Reggie Dailey
Salisbury
Put education first
Does no one get it except 16-year-old Alex Grubb (Feb. 10 letter “A student’s view of school priorities”)?
Why would the School Board even think of spending $30,000 on a staff/parent relations study when there are not enough textbooks for students wanting to better their education by taking AP classes? Rowan-Salisbury schools are in a precarious position with New Child Left Behind. Would not having enough books for students pump up these dismal test scores?
And Mr. Miller, that was the wrong answer to Karen Carpenter’s question of the top priority (a replacement school for Woodleaf or a new central office). “You’re just asking me to split the baby and choose between students and employees.” I thought our tax dollars were paying you, the assistant principal of schools, to take care of the students. The objective should be to get the best education possible for our children (our future leaders) ó not having a showplace to entertain visiting dignitaries and prospective teachers.
Let’s get on track and put education first ó make this a county people want to live in because of the superior educational opportunities.
ó Nancy T. Andrews
Salisbury
City already benefits
We are residents of Homestead Hills, one of the N.C. 150 developments which the city wishes to annex. We had to fight this battle 10 years ago, and here we go again. There may be a time when annexation will be more acceptable, but now is not the time. Our country is quickly approaching, if not already in, a recession.
We chose to live in the county when we built our house. In our neighborhood we have young couples who are in their first homes and have flexible interest rates (they are already feeling financial stress); we have middle-aged couples who in some instances have been laid off, have had to accept a lower paying job and are feeling financial stress. The neighborhood also has retired couples on fixed incomes. We enjoy living in the county. We have our own wells and septic systems; we pay extra for garbage pickup, support our rural fire departments, rescue squads and have a fine county Sheriff’s Office.
Some say that country residents just take from the city and do not pay taxes for services they take from the city. These are a few of the ways we pay city taxes and give back to the city. We buy our groceries in the city, our automobiles, furniture, office supplies, appliances, building supplies, clothing and specialty needs, eat at local restaurants, etc., and our money has never been refused because we live in the county. Some of us also attend church in the city; we support CROP Walks, United Way, deliver Meals On Wheels to those in need in both the city and county, Habitat for Humanity and Rowan Helping Ministries financially and also by working at the shelter preparing meals and washing clothing for the homeless.
We are caring people and do not want to be annexed!
ó R.T. Lowery
Salisbury
Heartfelt thanks
The Overton Elementary School PTA, the school’s staff and students would like to thank a host of organizations and businesses for supporting our recent Have a Heart Family Field Day.
This event really tells the story about the great Salisbury community that we live in. Organizations were eager to support this event, which gave us an opportunity to encourage families to spend time together learning about fitness, health, and nutrition in a fun, game-filled atmosphere.
In addition to the event sponsors ó Rowan Regional Medical Center and the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust ó we would also like to say a special thanks to the following organizations who sponsored stations, donated items or provided volunteers:
Adolescent & Family Enrichment Council, C.O.P.E. (Partnership with Catawba College), Catawba College Athletic Training Department, Chick-Fil-A, City of Salisbury Parks and Recreation Department, Food Lion, Greg Edds (State Farm Insurance), Health & Wellness Trust Fund, J.F. Hurley Family YMCA, Janet Sims (Kearns Business Solutions), Jazzercise/Steppin’ Out Dance Co., Jersey Mike’s, John Leatherman (State Farm Insurance), Nabisco, N.C. Oral Health Section of N.C. Public Health, North Rowan High Future Teachers of America Club, North Rowan High Allied Health, Project SAFE  Neighborhoods, Rowan Partnership for Community Health/Rowan County Health Department, Rowan-Salisbury Schools Child Nutrition Program, Rowan-Salisbury Schools Health Nurses, Salisbury Pediatric Associates and Windsong Bike Shop.
     Leah Ann Honeycutt
Honeycutt is president of the Overton PTA.
Flurry of memories
Regarding the Feb. 14 article “Unexpected snow brief but beautiful”:
I love reading your online paper, and tonight, I’m sitting here and got a chuckle after reading this. I lived in Kannapolis for almost nine years. Now, in nine years, I think we saw about 4 inches of snow. And when it came, it was always amazing. Such a thrill.
Now my wife, Donneta, and I live back home in West Virginia, where we have seen our fair share of snow. It would tickle me to see you folks get what we get ó 6, 8, 10 inches or even a foot at a time. But our lives are different than in North Carolina. When it snows here, schools stay open, stores stay open, and, yes, work goes on. The snow plows are always out in full force. And we have to go wherever we have to go.
But hazardous road conditions or not, we still get the thrill of seeing the snow, just like the people in North Carolina, and it’s always something to see.
ó Thomas Huffman
Mount Nebo, W.V.

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