Daughters of the American Revolution contest winners

  • Posted: Thursday, March 13, 2014 12:41 a.m.
Washko
Washko

The Elizabeth Maxwell Steele chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution named Samantha Ann Washko, a 12th-grader at Salisbury High School, as the local and District IV winner of the Christopher Columbus History Essay Contest for grades nine through 12.

The contest asked student to write about how Americans view Christopher Columbus and George Washington today.


Carleigh Perry, a fifth-grader from Granite Quarry Elementary, and Mary Caroline Kaufmann, an eighth-grader from North Hills Christian School, won the local and District IV history essay contest for grades five through eight. Students were asked to write about the lives of children during the American Revolution.

Kaufmann was also the eighth-grade winner at the state-level of the competition. She will read her essay at the state Daughters of the American Revolution meeting this spring. Her essay will move on to a Southeastern sectional competition and could possibly be entered in the national competition.

The Daughters of the American Revolution promotes American history and good citizenship through the annual essay contest.

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