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A silent rebellion, brought to light

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Emilee Rae Hibshman is a junior at Salisbury High School and editor of the Hornet Herald.

Emilee Rae Hibshman is a junior at Salisbury High School and editor of the Hornet Herald.

By Emilee Hibshman

Special to the Salisbury Post

In a recent article, I addressed how my generation is weary of the Trump presidency. Though my point still stands, I would like to revisit that topic in another way.

In September 2016, Colin Kaepernick knelt during the “Star Spangled Banner,” which caused an outrage throughout the country. Kaepernick stated to the New York Times, “Once again, I’m not anti-American. I love America. I love people. That’s why I’m doing this. I want to help make America better. I think having these conversations helps everybody have a better understanding of where everybody is coming from.”

Though his was certainly not the first protest to be made by someone in the public eye, it was one that everyone who has read the news in the past year knows about.

Following Kaepernick’s protest, many followed suit to protest the injustices occurring in this country. That being said, athletes and celebrities are not the only ones protesting in this way.

This year the Rowan-Salisbury School System has decided to bring back the Pledge of Allegiance every morning. Since Trump has been elected, many have chosen to sit through the pledge, not out of sheer ignorance, rather because they are the sons and daughters of immigrants from all over the world.

Since the Muslim travel ban, the executive order to begin construction on the wall on the United States-Mexico border, and the executive order to continue constructing the Dakota Pipeline, students of all ethnicities, religions, and economic statuses have taken a stand, or rather they have taken a seat.

Speaking to teachers of local schools, I have learned that many students choose to sit during the pledge to make a point. They know that it will not be a very significant protest, and that many may not know about it, which is why I wanted to bring it to light.

Let me also say that young people are not ignorant; they have an opinion about the social, economic and political state that their country is in, just like all the people who will read this article. They are also entitled, in this day and age, to not only share what they believe, but also act for it.

I have sat through the pledge, and was approached by a school employee who seemed disgusted by this action. The person asked if I was an American citizen, in an accusatory tone that made my action seem worth it.

Students all over the county have taken to going to marches, and now they are taking a stand in their schools. Currently, there is a uniting of several generations who are disgusted by the corruption and turmoil that is happening in this country, and they are taking a stand. It is a silent rebellion, that should and will be brought to light.

Emilee Hibshman is a a junior at Salisbury High School and the editor of the SHS Hornet Herald.

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