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UNC scholar discusses the Gospels on ‘Bookwatch’

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For many years before the authors wrote down the New Testament’s four gospels, followers of Jesus told and retold the stories of Jesus’s life and teaching.

New Testament and early Christian scholar, bestselling author, and professor of religious studies at UNC-Chapel Hill, Bart Ehrman became intrigued with the subject of memory and how different memories shaped the gospel accounts.

The result is his latest book, “Jesus Before the Gospels: How the Earliest Christians Remembered, Changed, and Invented Their Stories of the Savior.”

Ehrman explains how the varying accounts of Jesus’s life in the four Gospels could be the result of different memories of the same events.

“If we understand what psychologists have told us about memory and false memory, and about how we sometimes actually invent stories in our heads about the past … we will have a much clearer sense of what the Gospels are and of how we should understand the stories they tell about the historical Jesus.”

The program airs today at noon and Thursday, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m.

October 9

Margaret Maron, along with Clyde Edgerton and Carl Sandburg, will be inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame at the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities in Southern Pines on Oct. 16 at 2 p.m.

Her recent “Bookwatch” interview was recorded late last year at the Bouchercon convention in Raleigh, where she was honored for lifetime achievement. On “Bookwatch,” she explains that her latest “Long Upon the Land” will be the last in her 20-book Judge Deborah Knott series.

The novel is set southeast of Raleigh somewhere near the Johnston Country farm where Maron grew up. Like the other books in the series, her new book has multiple suspects.

This time several men in Judge Knott’s family are suspects. Woven into the mystery, Maron finally answers a question her fans have long asked: how did Deborah’s refined mother marry her father, a rough and ready bootlegger?

Bryant handles each suspect firmly but respectfully, finally winning a confession by asking questions based on facts uncovered and logical deductions from those facts.

Maron’s interview appears  Oct. 9  at noon and Thursday, Oct. 13 at 5 p.m.

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