• 70°

Other voices: Legitimate protesting

Peaceful demonstration

A woman displays her hands during a rally/prayer vigil at Marshall Park in Charlotte on Wednesday. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer/TNS)

A woman displays her hands during a rally/prayer vigil at Marshall Park in Charlotte on Wednesday. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer/TNS)

Excerpts from two North Carolina editorials about this week’s violence in Charlotte:

This week, Charlotte became one more visibly troubled city in America, another place that’s endured violent protests in the wake of a shooting involving police and a black person. Our city may be different from Ferguson or Baltimore, and our police have been progressive in building relationships with communities here. But Charlotte shares something with so many U.S. cities and towns – that blacks feel threatened in their interactions with law enforcement, and powerless in other ways.

No, that shouldn’t be expressed with lawlessness, as it was in uptown and elsewhere this week. But we shouldn’t dismiss those who protest peacefully because of the senselessness of those who don’t. The pain behind those legitimate protests is real, and we must confront it with real dialogue and real prescriptions on issues like economic mobility and school achievement gaps.

… Our police department and black leaders have done the right kind of work to encourage dialogue. Our city and county officials care about fixing the core problems that plague distressed neighborhoods. So do many other Charlotteans.

… The uptown protests will end eventually, and these streets will clean up nicely soon enough. But the pain behind the legitimate protests will remain. We can’t ignore it. We shouldn’t dismiss it. We should understand that what we’ve seen this week is a reminder, and an opportunity. We need to walk these streets, together.

— The Charlotte Observer

Lack of trust hurts

… The riot should not be used to fuel a narrative that Black Lives Matter is in conflict with public safety. To preserve real law and order, police must be even-handed and respectful of all persons whom they protect and serve. They have to earn the public’s trust. At the same time, there’s no excuse for extreme actions that put innocent lives at risk and destroy property. Police, and the civilian authorities who oversee the police, deserve the chance to do the right thing in the right way.

The Greensboro City Council took a step for openness Tuesday, voting to release body-cam video of police misconduct that occurred in June and led to an officer’s resignation. When police are willing to reveal mistakes, trust is strengthened.

Charlotte, like Greensboro, has been harmed by the effects of McCrory’s HB 2. It’s cost both cities ACC and NCAA events.

Lack of trust for police can hurt, too — even when the police aren’t wrong.

— Greensboro News and Record

Comments

Local

Exhibit about Jim Crow-era travel on display at NC Transportation Museum

Elections

GOP elections board members resign over absentee settlement

Crime

Drive-by shooting injures 24-year-old Salisbury man

Crime

Highway Patrol: Vehicle fled after striking, killing pedestrian on Camp Road

Local

Locals to be inducted into NC Military Veterans Hall of Fame

Business

Fall fun, with a twist: Patterson Farm adjusts to guidelines, offers new version of traditional events

Nation/World

Sayers, Piccolo friendship lives on in ‘Brian’s Song’

Education

Partners in learning passes last year’s special needs fashion show fundraiser with all-virtual event

Education

Shoutouts

Elections

Former history teacher to use ‘working knowledge of the issues’ in state House race

Business

Chamber adds more than 50 new businesses during Total Resource Campaign

Education

School board candidates for Salisbury seat split on consolidation

Education

Virtually no internet: Rural NC families struggle with online access for school-age children

Education

Horizons Unlimited taking learning to students this semester

Nation/World

NTSB: Pilot’s actions likely caused Earnhardt Jr. plane crash

Nation/World

2 Louisville officers shot amid Breonna Taylor protests

Coronavirus

Seven new COVID-19 positives reported at Piedmont Correctional

Crime

Blotter: Police respond to shots fired call outside of Salisbury home

Coronavirus

Rowan tied for fifth among counties for most COVID-19 deaths

Health

‘Nudge from God’: 10 years after diagnosis, Rockwell man to receive kidney from live donor

Crime

Salisbury police warn residents after increased trailer thefts

Education

Elon heightens alert as 32 test positive; Wake Forest in good shape to continue instruction as is

Cleveland

Corn picker catches fire at Knox Farm, destroying nearly eight acres

Nation/World

House easily passes stopgap funding bill, averting shutdown