• 72°

Darts & laurels: Wrong way to fight fat

Dart to the notion that putting an extra tax on soft drinks will help the country battle obesity. Sugary sodas are hardly the only thing fueling America’s battle of the bulge. Yet several cities have turned to such a tax to raise revenue.

Philadelphia’s City Council recently voted to tax distributors of sugary and diet beverages at 1.5 cents an ounce; the cost of a 12-ounce can of soda could go up 18 cents. In San Francisco, advertisements for sugar-sweetened drinks have to start carrying warning labels starting next month. Oakland, Calif., voters will decide this November whether to tax the drinks a penny per ounce.

There’s no question Americans have a weight problem. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than one-third of U.S. adults — some 78.6 million people — are obese. The condition can lead to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Declaring war on soft drinks is not going to correct that problem. What about the 2 million tons of french fries this country consumes each year?

Philadelphia’s tax advocates said they were motivated by the need to expand government services more than a desire to improve health. In that case, the tax could add to obesity — a fat city budget.

Laurels to people who care for relatives with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia-related diseases. A feature in last Sunday’s Post focused on Denny Eaborn, diagnosed at 56 with early onset dementia. He and wife Eugenie have a big-hearted family of 10 children, including several who are adopted. They treat him with great love. Alzheimer’s doesn’t have to be the end of life or the end of her children’s respect for their father, Eugenie says.

In “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End,” Dr. Atul Gawande says he learned about a lot of things in medical school, but mortality was not one of them. “We teach doctors how to try to save people. We teach very little about how we manage the realities of what we cannot fix,” Gawande has said. Families also struggle to deal with illnesses that cannot be “fixed.” The love and attention the Eaborn family shares with Denny is inspiring.

Comments

High School

High school football: Hornets overpower South to secure playoff spot

Crime

Jeffrey MacDonald won’t be released despite deteriorating health

Business

Amazon warehouse workers reject union in Alabama

Nation/World

Ex-NFL player’s brain to be probed for trauma-related harm after Rock Hill shootings

Education

Duke University to require COVID vaccinations for fall term

Education

Cooper OKs bill offering K-12 students summer school option

High School

High school football: Record night for Pinckney as East cruises; Carson wins thriller in OT

Nation/World

D-Day survivor, WWII torch bearer Ray Lambert dies at 100

Nation/World

Prince Philip was always defined by role as husband of British queen

BREAKING NEWS

One dead, several injured after head-on collision in China Grove

Crime

Man, woman charged for selling drugs to undercover deputies

Crime

Blotter: Rowan County man charged with indecent liberties with children

Local

Spencer town board gets look at Park Plaza progress

Business

‘Applicant market’: Unemployment rate improving as businesses hire more workers

Local

National, local business leaders praise Salisbury’s initiative to support Black-owned operations

Nation/World

Tillis has prostate cancer surgery

Coronavirus

Adverse reactions surface from Johnson & Johnson vaccine

Nation/World

Expert: Lack of oxygen killed George Floyd, not drugs

Local

Quotes of the week

Nation/World

Biden seeks crackdown on homemade firearms

Nation/World

Victim of former NFL player’s rampage wrote of faith, life’s fragility

News

Wrongly imprisoned man gets $750,000

High School

West falls to Statesville, finishes second in NPC

Education

Middle, high school students head back to classes full time