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Letters to the editor — Sunday (5-22-2016)

HB2 furor a waste of time, energy

Why are we wasting our time on HB2? Does anyone really believe a woman appearing to be a man or a man appearing to be a woman is not, as you read this, using the “wrong” restroom?

Unless we install monitored X-ray machines or hire someone to pat down restroom visitors, how do you know the sex of the person next to you? Considering women’s restrooms have only closed stalls, the exposure argument is a moot point. Unless, of course, you are going to peek under stalls.

As for an assault of a woman by a man entering the wrong restroom, by all statistics this is extremely unlikely. Besides, if a man intended to target a woman in the restroom, do you really believe HB2 would prevent this? We already have laws on the books prohibiting assault, kidnapping, rape, robbery, murder, etc. Last time I read the paper all of these laws are being broken on a regular basis.

When traveling with young children, for safety reasons, parents normally do not allow the child to venture off into a restroom alone. HB2 is not going to change this. At what age will this law be enforced? If you have a 5-year-old, are they breaking the law if they enter a bathroom for the opposite sex with their parent?

Bottomline, we are wasting time and money arguing over a bill which cannot be enforced. Why would anyone support HB2, a bill, which in all likelihood will be stuck down by a higher court? Allowing HB2 to remain on the books could cost North Carolina desperately needed funds from the federal government and has already cost us millions in lost revenue. Perhaps it is McCrory who needs to be replaced, which would at least stop the waste of money on his salary.

— Linda Hensley

Salisbury

 A destructive path

In an article written by Patrick Gannon (“Other voices on HB2,” May 18 Salisbury Post), the writer states the N.C. Psychological Association believes discrimination “harms people and can lead to depression, anxiety, suicide attempts, substance abuse and eating disorders.”

Perhaps, but so can cramming for finals, divorce, job loss and foreclosures. Listening to self-serving politicians and self-righteous ideologues can also have the same effect. I can’t believe the “Bathroom Bill” has become such a hot national topic.

I also can’t believe people are making this about civil rights and discrimination. Nobody is being denied a job, housing or the right to vote. It’s about your physical anatomy determining where you can relieve yourself. The fact you feel like a woman even through you are a man, and vice versa, should be irrelevant. Facts are facts, and if we start dictating policy based on feelings and not reality, order will become lost. The old “if it feels good do it” mentality has returned, and if anyone opposes those feelings, you’re some sort of sexist, racist, bigot, homophobe.

What we have here is moral anarchy, and to stay on this path can only be destructive. Political correctness was born out of trying to understand, feel for and help others. Now it’s just become my way or the highway.

— Allan Gilmour

Salisbury

Flush the bill

North Carolina’s Governor McCrory to legislators on HB2: Repeat after me:

“Folks are dumb from where I come, they ain’t had any learnin’.  Still they’re happy as can be, doin’ what comes naturally!” With apologies to Irving Berlin.

Finally, one has to wonder if Governor McCrory read the ill-conceived HB2 bill that purports a set of “Bathroom Etiquette” rules. It is a stupid, unworkable, unenforceable, unconstitutional bill that deserves to be flushed!

— Herb Stark

Mooresville

 

Teachers need support

Regarding the May 19 article “Teacher quits amid allegations”:

If a teacher felt she had to tape my child to his desk, I would have thanked her and looked for help for my child. There is a reason he cannot sit still. He has a physical problem or he is looking for attention. If the other children say it was his fault, believe them.  This is one reason we can’t keep teachers. They have no support from parents.

— Jo Shaw

Salisbury

 

 

Words to ponder

“The Bible is the chief moral cause of all that is good, and the best book for regulating the concerns of men. The man, therefore, who weakens or destroys the divine authority of that book may be accessory to all the public disorders which society is doomed to suffer.” — Written by Peter Marshall, 1902-1949.

— Lola Floss

Salisbury

Comments

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