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Letters to the editor – Sunday (6-21-15)

A physics problem  to ponder …

I need some help in understanding a basic problem in physics. It has been over 30 years since I sat in a college physics class, so I may have forgotten a great deal.

The First Law of Thermodynamics states that energy can neither be created or destroyed. It can only change forms.

According to Einstein’s Special Relativity ( E=mxCxC), matter can be converted into energy and vice-versa in nuclear reactions.  You will notice I did not label it as “Einstein’s Theory of Relativity,” because thousands of experiments have proven the theory to be a basic law of physics. As a matter of fact, nuclear weapons would not work if the process was not a reality.

When we combine these two basic laws of physics we come to the understanding that matter or energy cannot be created or destroyed.

The problem comes into view when we ask, where did the matter or energy in the universe come from in the first place? Therefore, according to the basic laws of physics, our world should not exist.

And we have not even discussed how inanimate matter could somehow organize itself into a living cell, capable of self-reproduction, when no lab in the world has ever replicated the event through a carefully devised experimental procedure.

I have been forced to accept only one conclusion.

Gen 1:1  “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.”

— Joe Teeter

Gold Hill

Hurting nonprofits

I work for Novant Health in a physician’s office. As an employee and also a patient within the healthcare system, I would like to strongly voice my opposition to said budget proposal as it would devastate the very patients and communities it serves.

In an everchanging world it is difficult enough to provide quality care and also maintain the stability of an industry that serves and  employs so many people. Our company has done an excellent job of trying to do both over the last several years.

If you truly want to represent the people you serve, consider how many people you will affect based upon your choices. They should preserve the current tax exemptions for nonprofit organizations, including sales tax refunds for hospitals and other non-profit organizations as this is critical to care patients are able to receive and also to those who care for them.

— Christy Stone

Winston Salem

Missing the point

First it was Butch Hudson with his anti-Christian rant. Then we had Franklin Graham with his assault on homosexuals. Both seem to miss the point of Jesus’ teaching. When asked what the greatest commandment was, Jesus answered, “Love God.” When asked what the next greatest commandment was, He answered, “Love thy neighbor.” He followed this with the parable of the Samaritan, using the Jew’s hereditary enemy as an example.

Mr. Hudson does point out that Jesus’ teaching in the Gospels describes a great pattern for living and dealing with others. It would be nice if Mr. Graham and other “Christians” followed that road, instead of just the parts they like. History tells us there’s not much chance of that.

Christ taught and practiced “Love Thy Neighbor” using the traditional enemy as an example of who “our neighbor” is. When He asked the Samaritan woman for a cup of water, she was a neighbor and He loved her.

Only once did He show animus, which was towards money-changers outside the Temple who were cheating devout Jews. He did, however, call out the hypocrites who preach loudly in the Temple and on the streets, as well as those who make loud their alms giving, to gain public credit. We continue to have a surplus of both of these and they receive their reward here and now.

Mr. Graham and some other “Christians” seem willing to condemn and even hate selected groups whom they consider sinners.  But Christ didn’t. Based on Christ’s teaching I guess they also have their reward in the here and now.

To Mr. Hudson I would say the majority of Christ’s followers do try to follow His example, but quietly in their acts, good works and love of their (strange) neighbors. If he looks he can find them and join in.

— Jack Burke

Salisbury

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