• 50°

Catawba students delve into professional communication

If Catawba students find the 2014-15 Student Handbook easier to navigate and understand, they can thank some of their peers for taking on the task of making it more student-friendly.
Students in Dr. Margy Stahr’s spring professional and technical writing class took on that task as well as the task of revising several other handbooks used on campus, including the tutoring manual for academic support services, the social media manual for athletics and the study abroad faculty handbook. These assignments allowed Stahr’s students to “practice working on large-scale projects,” she said.
Katelin Rice of Thomasville, a member of one group that tackled a portion of the student handbook, said, “We felt it was important from a student’s point of view that it be accessible and easily understood. We tried to simplify portions of it, but found it was hard to simplify while maintaining a level of professionalism.”
Danielle Bunten of Southport and Timberley Motsinger of Winston-Salem also tackled sections of the student handbook concerning clubs and organizations on campus.
They found that some clubs, especially new ones, were not included in the handbook.
“We included what each club does, what its activities are, and how to become a member for each,” Motsinger said.
Theo Shepard of Southport and his group worked on the tutoring manual, a handbook they created from different resources provided to them by staff members in academic support services.
“We had to decide what was most useful,” Shepard said.
“I love the fact that we can utilize our students to help us improve our current documents and processes. They are the benefactors of these services, so it only make sense to gather their input all while putting their education to use,” said Catawba’s Director of Initiatives for Student Success Andie Lynch.
Shakeisha Gray of Salisbury, whose group worked on the faculty study abroad handbook, said the goal was to “make the voice more approachable and not so technical.”
Katie Barbee of Salisbury said her group focused on updating the Twitter guidelines in the social media manual for athletics.
Andrew McCollister of Rockwell, a member of her group, noted that the attempt was to “keep the language professional while spreading the love” for the team or the sport.
“Social media can be difficult balancing the professional side of business with the conversational style of use,” explained David McDowell, Catawba’s director of athletic marketing and assistant sports information director. “The students involved in this project did a wonderful job merging these two styles and creating a foundation in the social media manual for our department to build upon.”
“The students and I learned that any time you have a manual or a handbook that many people have contributed to over a number of years, the message is likely to become muddy,” Stahr said.
Her students were also assigned the task of interviewing local professionals, including an attorney, a business owner, a dentist, an educator and a writer about how they use writing in their professions.
“The most important thing to me about this project is that it required students to not only engage in professional forms of communication, but to actually act in a professional way,” Stahr explained.
Student Leah Thompson of Salisbury chose to interview a professional photographer. The photographer’s primary forms of communication were e-mails, advertising and blogging via social media platforms. Thompson said she learned that “a lot of clients means a lot of communication.”
Andrew McCollister, who aspires to be a dentist, interviewed a local dentist. He learned that the dentist engages in three different types of communication: communication with patients, inter-office communication and company communication. The need for clarity and conciseness, McCollister said, were stressed by the dentist.
McCollister summed up what he and his classmates learned during the process of delving into professional communications: “All of us agree that knowing the audience for your communication is key.”

Comments

Comments closed.

News

Racial bias ‘deeply entrenched’ in report critical of Apex Police Department

Nation/World

US bombs facilities in Syria used by Iran-backed militia

Elections

City council again dismisses idea of adding new member, focus now on recommendation to delay elections

Business

‘Let’s make some money:’ Loosened restrictions praised by bar owners, baseball team

High School

Salisbury High bucks historical trend in dominant shutout of West Rowan

Enochville

Garage declared total loss after Enochville fire

Crime

Cooper, N.C. prison officials agree to release 3,500 inmates

Coronavirus

Two more COVID-19 deaths reported in Rowan, six for the week

Crime

Blotter: Man brandishes AR-15, runs over motorcycle at Rockwell-area gas station

Crime

Salisbury man charged with exploitation of minor

Crime

Road rage incident results in assault charges

Local

Dukeville lead testing results trickle in, more participation needed

Education

Faith Academy interviewing staff, preparing site for fall opening

News

Volunteers work around obstacles, alter procedures to offer free tax services to those in need

Education

Education shoutouts

Local

Retired Marine gets recognition for toy collection efforts

Local

March issue of Salisbury the Magazine is now available

Education

Five get Dunbar School Heritage Scholarships

Education

Education briefs: Salisbury Academy fourth-graders think big as inventors

Education

Bakari Sellers keynote speaker at Livingstone College Founder’s Day program

Nation/World

Biden aims to distribute masks to millions in ‘equity’ push

Nation/World

Chief: Capitol Police were warned of violence before riot

Nation/World

GOP rallies solidly against Democrats’ virus relief package

Nation/World

FDA says single-dose shot from Johnson & Johnson prevents severe COVID