• 57°

I appreciate the effort put forth by Mark Wineka to print a non-biased and completely truthful article (March 8) about the egregious incident where a Salisbury police officer slammed my father onto the floor of his private room, breaking bones, hospitalizing him and causing him to be non-weightbearing for six weeks. I hope this will not become a conversation about denomination and religion, since Daddy is a long retired minister, for it is truly a moral question of right and wrong, and does wearing a police badge give one the right to deliver their own form of justice?
Since Daddy has requested a jury trial — which, according to law, is to be a jury of his peers — I hope the city doesn’t rush out and try to get the trial moved to Greensboro or Winston-Salem, which they have done in the past when there has been a case regarding a charge of police brutality. That removes the injured party from their peers and puts them in an environment of strangers who have different philosophies coming from the bigger cities. Of course, it is good for the defense, since they want the trial to be as far away from where the incident happened as possible.
Ironically, Daddy was never charged with anything, as there was nothing to charge him with. I guess something had to be put on the police call report to cover/justify sending him to the hospital with multiple fractures, so attempting to assault a police officer sounded good, except no one substantiates that, not my husband or the others who witnessed the incident.
We, the people and taxpayers of Rowan County, many of whom have argued about visibility in government, should demand visibility of the Police Department. This incident should not be hidden under a rock. Protect is the first word in “protect and serve.”
— Shari Loy Keller
Salisbury

I just wanted to thank all the Duke Energy linemen, all the electrical contractors and all involved in restoring our power.
We at times take these highly skilled workers for granted, until nasty weather comes and snaps trees and causes havoc. I was extremely impressed when we were told our power wouldn’t be restored until late Sunday evening, and we got it back Saturday evening. Thanks again for giving us back the warmth and the lights we take for granted.
— Leah Fry
Woodleaf

In a March 6 article in the Post about the Landis town board meeting, it was written resident Nadine Cherry inquired about the board’s plans for town-owned land. That is incorrect. The word inquire means to seek information by questioning. I did not ask anything, I just made a simple statement, which is as follows: “Nadine Cherry, 410 West Garden St., Landis. Whether or not these six parcels are brought into the town’s limits by annexation, they need to be put up for sale, as these parcels have a total value of $149,604. I checked on it this afternoon.”
Mayor Furr did make the following statement: “I would like to add, this gift is a very important gift to the town of Landis. It has a very strategic purpose in the location and the value of it.”
At no time during the meeting did Mayor Furr or any board member make the statement that the land was going to be put up for sale and that the money would be used for a passive park.
— Nadine Cherry
Landis

Here’s a look at how inflation has impacted three of our household commodities over the years.
First-class stamp: Cost 29 cents in March 1981 versus 49 cents in March 2014 — a 69 percent increase, or 2.1 percent yearly over 33 years.
Gallon of gas: $2 in March 2005 versus $3.50 in March 2014 — a 75 percent increase, or 8.3 percent yearly over nine years.
Cable bill: $11 per month in March 1981 versus $71 per month in March 2014 — a 645 percent increase, or 19.5 percent yearly over 33 years.
I believe you still get basically the same return for stamps and gas, but note the number of channels available invariably goes down each year. Check it out for yourself. How far can this trend go?
— W.L. Poole
Salisbury

Comments

Comments closed.

Business

‘It’s our big time’: Salisbury Farmers Market reopens Saturday

Education

Schools capital funding still frozen as RSS sends local budget to county

Business

Shields, Cheerwine Festival receive N.C. Main Street Awards

Kannapolis

Duke University launches kidney disease study in Kannapolis for people of African descent

Education

Horizons Unlimited will hold in-person summer camps

Education

Education briefs: Catawba planning for more in-person activities, free summer school tuition

Coronavirus

County’s full COVID-19 vaccinations top 22,600

High School

High school golf: With Merrell, Mustangs back on top

Local

Spencer investigating rat problem on South Iredell Street

News

Livingstone, Mission House Church to host national ‘Black Voters Matter’ listening session

Education

Shoutouts

Business

Groundbreaking on Pennant Square signals next phase in downtown Kannapolis revitalization

Nation/World

J&J vaccine to remain in limbo while officials seek evidence

Nation/World

Prosecutors: No charges for officer in Capitol riot shooting

Nation/World

Biden to pull US troops from Afghanistan, end ‘forever war’

Nation/World

Former Minnesota cop charged in shooting of Black motorist

Crime

Blotter: April 14

Elections

Former North Carolina Gov. McCrory enters US Senate race

Crime

Salisbury woman arrested in Myrtle Beach for abducting child

Health

County updates health director job description, will advertise for position

High School

High school tennis: East beats Carson, still hopes to share NPC title

Elections

Board of Elections to purchase upgraded voting equipment using federal grant

Kannapolis

Kyle Seager drives in winning run in first game as Mariners split doubleheader with Orioles

Local

City exhausts this year’s funds for Innes Street Improvements, Municipal Services District grant programs