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Popular young adult books hit the big screen

Young adult readers will be able to watch some of their favorite best-selling books come to life this year in theaters. If you haven’t gotten your hands on any of these great reads, be sure to do so. Then you can read the book and compare. Here is a rundown of the titles.
“Vampire Academy” by Richelle Mead. Vampire princess Lissa and her guardian-in-training Rose are captured and forced to return to St. Vladimir’s Academy. At the academy, Lissa focuses on mastering magic while Rose works on her physical training to help protect Lissa from the deadly Strigoi, undead vampires that feed from and kill Lissa’s kind. This is the first title in a six-book series.
“Divergent” by Veronica Roth. Sixteen-year-old Beatrice must choose from among five predetermined factions that will define her identity. She chooses Dauntless, the path of courage. Her choice exposes her to the demanding, violent initiation rites of this group, but it also threatens to expose a personal secret that could place her in mortal danger. This is the first book in a trilogy centered on adventure, love and loyalty.
“The Fault in Our Stars” by Jon Green. Sixteen-year-old Hazel has terminal cancer. While attending a support group meeting to help her deal with her illness, she meets Augustus, a cancer patient in remission. Using Augustus’ leftover Make-a-Wish, the two set off to meet Hazel’s favorite author and find companionship and love along the way.
“The Giver” by Lois Lowry. Jonas lives in a perfect world where there is no war, fear or pain. At 12 he is given his lifetime assignment at the Ceremony of Twelve. He is to become the receiver of memories, the one who receives from the Giver all the true joys and pains of his society. What will Jonas do with the knowledge that only he is given? You can also read the companion books “Gathering Blue,” “Messenger” and “Son.”
“If I Stay” by Gayle Forman. One minute 17-year-old Mia is happily riding in the car with her family and the next she sees herself being lifted from a twisted wreck. While in a coma she reflects on her past and decides whether she wants to fight to live. Via Mia’s thoughts and flashbacks you’ll explore her life, her passion for classical music and her strong relationships with her family, friends and boyfriend.
“The Maze Runner” by James Dashner. Thomas wakes up in total darkness and remembers nothing but his first name. He is trapped in a bizarre place devoid of adults called the Glade — an enclosed structure with a jail, a graveyard, a slaughterhouse, living quarters and gardens. Outside the Glade is the Maze, and every day some of the boys assigned as Runners venture into the labyrinth, attempting to find an exit from this unruly place. The other titles in this trilogy are “The Scorch Trials” and “The Death Cure.”
“Mockingjay” by Suzanne Collins. In the ruins of North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by 12 outlying districts. The Capitol is harsh and cruel and forces each district to send one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 to participate in the annual Hunger Games, a fight to the death on live TV. Sixteen-year-old Katniss, who lives alone with her mother and younger sister, considers it a death sentence when she is forced to represent her district in the Games. This is the last book in the Hunger Games trilogy.
These titles are available at Rowan Public Library.
Children’s Storytime: Weekly Story Time Feb. 3 through May 2. For more information call 704-216-8234.
Toddler Time (18- to 35-month olds) — 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, headquarters; 11 a.m. Mondays, East.
Baby Time (6- to 23-month olds) — 10 a.m. Wednesdays, headquarters; 10 a.m. Mondays, East.
Preschool Time (3- to 5-year-olds) — 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, headquarters; 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays, South; 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Thursdays, East.
Noodlehead (4- to 8-year-olds) — 4 p.m. Thursdays, headquarters; 4 p.m. Mondays, South.
Tiny Tumblers (6- to 35-month-olds) — Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30 a.m., South.
Children’s art programs: Learn different art techniques and start a new art project; runs weekly during storytime. Art in the Afternoon, headquarters, Thursdays, 4:30 p.m.; Art Party, South, Wednesdays, 4 p.m.; Art with Char, East, Thursdays, 4 p.m.
PAC Club: Headquarters, Feb. 8, 11 a.m. “How to Train Your Dragon.” Popular Activities and Crafts Club, focusing on a different children’s book series each month for school-aged children. Call 704-216-8234 for more information.
Book Chats for children at South branch: Feb. 20, 4:15 p.m., “Mercy Watson to the Rescue,” by Kate DeCamillo, grade 2. Children in grades 2-5 are invited to participate in Book Chats. Registration is required and space is limited. Please call 704-216-7728 for more information.
Chocolate festival for teens: All 5:30-7 p.m. Chocolate trivia, chocolate games and a chocolate fountain. For more information call 704-216-8234. South, Feb. 11; East, Feb. 24; headquarters, Fab. 25.
Classic chicks film festival and spa night: 6-8 p.m.; Feb. 11 at headquarters, Feb. 17 at South. We are expanding the festival to include the South Rowan location. We begin the evening with light refreshments, followed by a series of short musical and comedy films. In between, there will be foot soaks, facials and more. Admission is free, but space is limited. Ensure your spot by registering online at www.rowanpubliclibrary.org or by calling 704-216-8229.
Free workshop on children and nutrition: Headquarters, Feb. 19, children’s room, headquarters. Families with children ages birth to 5 years old are invited. Attendees will learn about popular food ingredients and how they affect our bodies; ways to make healthy foods attractive to children; and simple physical activities to get ourselves and our children up and moving. We will have interactive discussions, a fun nutrition craft, a healthy snack, and each family will receive a book to take home. This program is presented by Smart Start in cooperation with Rowan Public Library.
Boost your mood workshop: South, Feb. 24-25, 7:15 p.m. Participants will learn fun ways to improve mood through exercise. This program will be led by the South Rowan YMCA. Professional massage therapist Travis Alligood will give free chair massages. All ages welcome, but anyone under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. There will be a chance to win door prizes. Participants who attend four out of five workshops will be entered to win grand prize. No charge to participate; registration is required. Visit www.rowanpubliclibrary.org or call 704-216-7734 to register or for more information.
Computer classes: Feb. 17, 7 p.m., South; Feb. 18, 1 p.m., East (registration required for East only, call 704-216-8242); Feb. 20, 9:30 a.m., Headquarters. If you’re new to computers or if you’ve just never felt comfortable with them, this is the class for you. We’ll go over the very basics of computers, from discussing computer components to how programs are opened and closed. We may even practice clicking the mouse. Classes are free. Sessions are about 90 minutes long. Class size is limited and on a first-come, first-serve basis. Dates and times at all locations are subject to change without notice.
Book Bites Club: South (only), Feb. 25, 6:30 p.m., “Catch Me If You Can,” by Frank Abagnale. Book discussion groups for adults and children meet the last Tuesday of each month. The group is open to the public and anyone is free to join at any time. There is a discussion of the book, as well as light refreshments at each meeting. For more information, please call 704-216-8229.
Displays for February: headquarters, log cabins, North Hills Christian School; South, student art, Corriher Lipe Middle School; East, 4-H by Ann Furr.
Literacy: Call the Rowan County Literacy Council at 704-216-8266 for more information on teaching or receiving literacy tutoring for English speakers or for those for whom English is a second language.

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