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In 2012, I was barely old enough to register to vote, yet I registered 133 voters, half of whom were under 18. I registered classmates and strangers alike in hopes of encouraging my peers, the youth, to take a more active role in government. When it came down to it, the hardest task I faced was not registering voters but exciting them for the political process. So, my question is, if there is so much apathy among our youth regarding politics and voting, why are Republicans making it harder for people to vote? This is a question not even our governor can answer.
Another question for some of our legislators: Why are you getting rid of same-day registration? In 2012, I had a woman cry when I took her to vote for the first time at the age of 65. She never had the time or access to register to vote and was able to take advantage of same-day registration. Why take away same-day registration, when this helps citizens to vote?
Finally, I have many friends in college who use their college IDs as identification. They don’t carry their driver’s license because they do not have a car at college. So my last question: Why, if the state of North Carolina provides these college IDs, are they not sufficient to serve as a form of identification?
The bill that took away all these opportunities is said to curb voter fraud, which studies have shown is a minute problem. How does limiting opportunities to vote reduce voter fraud? These new laws are irrelevant to a problem that rarely occurs. In the past century alone the country has made great strides in allowing all citizens to vote. Why, Republicans, are you reversing the progress the country has made? You say this law stems voter fraud; I say it disenfranchises a large segment of the population.
— Emma Labovitz

Salisbury

I had always been taught that charity begins at home and spreads abroad.
To build a Habitat house is a wonderful and admirable investment, but to say that college students will help build a house in Spencer and be transported there on weekends until the completion makes some community people wonder. Spencer is not part of this community; in fact, it is considered part of the county.
An opportunity for Livingstone College students to restore some of the Monroe Street homes would be a much more feasible investment in the local college community.
As a matriculating student, I would be proud to say, “I helped to restore the Samuel E. Duncan School, the John Dancy home or the William Trent home.” Since these men of great stature were greatly admired for their love of and dedication to the college, several buildings on the campus were named in their memory.
Unfortunately, Bishop Harris’ home was recently demolished, but there is a building in his memory, Harris Hall. The design of the Nicholson home is one of a kind in the state.
Most of the Monroe Street homes were built by black craftsmen/contractors, which is another reason to be proud of what is here.
Think of returning for class reunions or other special occasions “beneath the maples and the oaks” and being able to say, “I helped to beautify this home or this building, rather than drive to another town to show what could have been done at home.”
More proudly for posterity, a student could proudly say, “My parents helped in the restoration/renovation of this home or this building.”
Again, charity begins at home, then spreads …
— B.B. Sherrill

Salisbury

Congratulations to Carol Washington Lewis and the Dunbar High School classes of 1966, ’67, ’68 and ’69 on your very successful prom.
I heard that you all had a lovely time. I am sure that meeting class- and school-mates brought back many happy memories. If by chance the Dunbar School Mass Reunion has been inspirational in the formation of this event, to God be the glory! In working with the Dunbar reunion committee from 1984 to 2013, I have learned to give all the honor, praise and glory to God, not to myself. I believe that is why every reunion has grown bigger and better.
We, the Dunbar Mass Reunion Committee, credit all of our success to God, our chairperson and leader, who has given us wisdom and knowledge. It was God who has guided us to great heights with the reunion. He came to me in a dream and said, “Have a parade.” We followed the leadership of our most high God, and the parade become a reality.
We were doubtful at first, but faith taught us that with our heavenly Father, all things are possible. The parade has grown from two bands to seven.
Thanks be to God, the maker of heaven and Earth! Let us give him glory by working together.
— Essie Mae Foxx

East Spencer

Essie May Foxx is president of the Dunbar School Mass Reunion Committee.

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