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We need more jobs, lower taxes

It was interesting to read David Post’s editorial question (June 10), “Who’s going to pay for my tax cut?” The real question is, “Who is paying your taxes now?” Every business accepts taxes as part of the cost of doing business. As the tax rates increase, the cost of doing business increases and those costs are passed on to consumers through higher prices. The truth is that Mr. Post’s customers pay his taxes, and for that he should be grateful.
As for the tax cut, North Carolina had one of the highest state taxes in the Southeast. For that reason, businesses have tended to locate in other states that had lower tax rates. What North Carolina needs is more jobs. Cutting taxes will encourage more businesses to locate here, and existing businesses will have more money to expand. More jobs will raise everyone’s standard of living. To paraphrase an old adage, “All ships will rise with a rising tide of job creation.”
It is amazing that the Republicans have become the source of all problems in our state even though the Democrats have been in power for the last 100 years. Albert Einstein’s definition of insanity fits this situation very well: “Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” It is refreshing that the Republicans are trying to right the course in North Carolina and are willing to take some political heat by trying to balance the state budget through the spreading of the pain throughout the populace while encouraging job growth.
If Mr. Post feels his tax burden is too low, he should seriously consider returning his company’s tax break to the state. If he is truly concerned about the poor, he will understand that increased business and increased employment is the answer to our budgetary and monetary woes.
— Frank Goodnight

Salisbury

Goodnight is president of Diversified Graphics.

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