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Background checks, bullet buying raise questions
The liberal press tells us that everyone agrees that “comprehensive” background checks would be a key element in reducing mass killings. Sounds great. These horrible acts are committed by the mentally unstable. Why not deny them weapons by rejecting their applications to purchase a gun? There are dozens of entities that will continue to keep these deranged people from being listed.
Who is crazy as opposed to being just eccentric? That debate will go on forever. There are lots of other reasons these “comprehensive” background checks won’t do much good. The gun ban liberals know this. Their real goal is to create a detailed list of who owns guns. Knowing this is the essential first step to the confiscation of guns. Tyrants learned that many generations ago.
Meanwhile, the Department of Homeland Security (Gestapo?) just bought 1,700 assault rifles and 1.6 billion rounds of ammunition. When we ask why, they tell us it is for training and that the huge supply provides savings through quantity purchasing. This begs even more questions. Who is going to be issued these assault weapons? Why? We do appreciate the interest in saving money. In saving all this money DHS has almost completely closed the ammunition market to all others. Even police departments have had to curtail training because they can’t get the necessary ammunition. All of these 1.6 billion rounds are loaded with JHP (man-killing) bullets. They cost twice as much as the ammo universally used for training. Is it really just training ammo? If so, at current usage rates, 1.6 billion rounds will last slightly more than 100 years. Now that’s what I call long-range planning!
All this might make me a little nervous if the great leader of the most open administration in history had not promised me that the Second Amendment was safe in his hands.
— Joe Roberts

Salisbury

A proud teacher
Having taught students in high school for 33 years, I delight in learning of their success. Recently Jennifer Bringle and Andy Mooney have won awards of merit; both were my students and products of North Rowan High School. I am most proud of their accomplishments.
Jennifer won first place in the 2013 Rose Post Creative Nonfiction category for her essay, “Mamaw’s House.” The judge wrote, “This was a winner from the very first sentence to the very last.” Her essay will appear in the literary magazine, ”Southern Cultures.”
Andy Mooney won three honors in the North Carolina Press Association Contest. The first he shared with Jon Lakey as page designer and graphic artist; second and third were his alone for a photo of “Miss Cheerwine” and graphic design.
Many students of mine have been more successful than I could ever have imagined. I wish I could list their names; however, the Post limits editorial comments and my list is endless.
I always felt that I was charmed as my students made my life happy as a teacher. Even today I reap the benefits of sharing their success and happiness. I continue to be rewarded through the success of my students.
— Julie S. Pinkston

Salisbury

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