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Code Orange air quality health notice

RALEIGH – Air quality officials have issued a health notice for air pollution in the Charlotte and Triangle metropolitan areas today.
Forecasters have predicted Code Orange conditions, which means that air quality in these areas is likely to be unhealthy for sensitive groups. People who are sensitive to air pollution should avoid moderate exertion outdoors. Sensitive groups include: children and older adults; people who work or exercise outdoors; people with heart conditions; and those with asthma, bronchitis, emphysema and other respiratory ailments. The primary pollutant of concern is ozone, a highly reactive form of oxygen. Ozone can be unhealthy to breathe, and high levels generally occur on days with stagnant air.
The air pollution forecast for Thursday predicts that ozone levels in Charlotte and the Triangle will exceed the federal standard of 75 parts per billion averaged during eight hours. High ozone levels can impair breathing and aggravate symptoms in people with respiratory problems, and irritate the lungs in healthy individuals. People with chronic lung ailments, older adults and children should reduce physical exertion and outdoor activity in the afternoon, when ozone levels are highest.
The N.C. Division of Air Quality issues daily air forecasts for the Triangle, Charlotte, Asheville, Hickory, Fayetteville and Rocky Mount metropolitan areas. In the Triad, forecasts are issued by the Forsyth County Environmental Affairs Department. The forecasts are part of the N.C. Air Awareness Program, a voluntary effort aimed at reducing air pollution in the state’s major metro areas. Air quality officials are asking residents to help reduce air pollution by taking some of the following actions:
Limit driving by riding the bus, walking, bicycling or postponing trips.
If you drive, avoid idling for long periods of time, stay within speed limits, combine errands to reduce the number of small trips, and use vehicles with higher fuel economies.
Conserve electricity by setting thermostats at the highest comfortable temperature and turning off appliances that are not in use.
In addition, residents of affected areas should refrain from outdoor burning on Code Orange and Red days. It is illegal to burn paper, trash, construction materials and other non-vegetative matter in North Carolina. The DAQ estimates that more than half of North Carolina’s residents live in counties where ozone levels exceed the standard during warmer months. In 1999, the N.C. General Assembly passed legislation aimed at reducing ozone-forming emissions from cars and trucks, including an expansion of the motor vehicle emissions inspection program from nine to 48 counties. In 2002, the General Assembly enacted legislation that will require the state’s coal-fired power plants to reduce their ozone- and haze-forming emissions by three-fourths during the next decade.
For more information about air quality forecasts, open burning restrictions and other air issues, visit the division’s website at www.ncair.org or call 1-888-RU4NCAIR (1-888-784-6224). Information about air quality in the Triad can be found at http://www.co.forsyth.nc.us/EnvAffairs/default.aspx .

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