• 66°

You decide: Is North Carolina’s economy still changing?

By Dr. Mike Walden
North Carolina Cooperative Extension
Itís often said we need to know where weíve been to know where weíre going. This adage can certainly be applied to the economy. Old timers like me, who have been around North Carolina for decades, know the state is a different place today than it was 30 or 40 years ago. Textiles, tobacco and furniture are still here but are a much smaller part of the economy today than they were then. Weíve changed, but to what?
Many would say the ěto whatî has not been good. Thereís an image of low-paying service jobs replacing well-compensated factory jobs. While some of this has certainly occurred, the reality of economic change is more complicated.
A couple of years ago I wrote a book about North Carolinaís economy called ěNorth Carolina in the Connected Age.î In it, I detailed the transformation of the North Carolina economy. At its peak, the stateís legacy industries ó the Big Three of tobacco, textiles and furniture ó accounted for almost one-fourth of all of North Carolinaís economic activity. By the start of the 21st century, the Big Threeís share was down to less than 8 percent.
Fortunately for our state, we both imported and home-grew new industries. We imported motor vehicle parts manufacturing from the midwest. We first imported and then expanded the technology and pharmaceutical sectors. Food processing expanded along with the shift in agriculture from crops to livestock. And banking ó headquartered in Charlotte ó grew to be the stateís largest single industry through mergers and acquisitions throughout the country.
Indeed, while the Big Three were shrinking, these new industries of technology, pharmaceuticals, banking, food processing and motor vehicle parts ó the new Big Five as I call them ó were growing to account for over 15 percent of the stateís economy by 2000.
But weíre now in 2011. Whatís happened over the past decade? Is what makes North Carolina tick still changing?
The answer is an unqualified ěyes.î The Big Threeís share of the state economy is now down to 4 percent, while the Big Fiveís proportion is up to 20 percent. So the transformation of North Carolinaís economy from the traditional industries to the new industries continues.
Yet this doesnít mean there havenít been shake-ups. Among the new Big Five, banking and pharmaceuticals had the smallest gains, growing only slightly faster than the overall economy. Next were more rapid gains in food processing and motor vehicle parts.
The clear star in industry growth in North Carolina during the last decade was technology. Its production value increased at triple digit rates. Indeed, the value of all durable manufacturing in the state soared by more than 40 percent, surpassing the national growth rate in durable manufacturing by three to two.
Was this continuing shift in industries in North Carolina good for the state? Change is always hard. Any time one set of industries declines while others grow, some workers will benefit while others lose. Workers from the old jobs donít necessarily have the skills for positions in the new industries. This is a continuing issue in North Carolina and the country.
But in the turbulent first decade of the 21st century, we can say that North Carolina outperformed the nation. From the start of the decadeís economic expansion beginning in late 2001 to its end in 2007, North Carolinaís job growth beat national job growth 8 percent to 5.5 percent, and the stateís value of economic production outpaced national production 18 percent to 16 percent. So we were able to grow and change at the same time.
Will our stateís economic transformation continue? Yes. Will the same industries dominate the stateís economy a decade in the future? Likely not! Thereís already evidence from the last decade of new economic upstarts, specifically information and the military, both of which had fast growth in the 2000s. To these may be added alternative energy, tourism and possibly auto assembly in the future.
One thing Iíve learned from studying economics for almost 40 years is that change is the one constant. The North Carolina economy is an excellent example of this principle. The eternal question is, change to what? You decide!

Dr. Mike Walden is a William Neal Reynolds Professor and N.C. Cooperative Extension economist in N.C. State Universityís College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Previous ěYou Decideî columns are available at www.cals.ncsu.edu/ agcomm/news-center/tag/you-decide.

Comments

Comments closed.

Local

City Council to consider 230-home development on Rowan Mill Road near Grants Creek

Nation/World

Smoke triggers pollution alerts in US West, Midwest

Crime

Former employee charged in shooting at Charlotte game room

Crime

Report: Young child among 3 shot in road rage shooting

Ask Us

Ask Us: When will Britton Village apartment complex be complete?

Nation/World

DaBaby booted from Lollapalooza after homophobic comments

Crime

Kannapolis man charged with 15 counts of sexually exploiting of minor

Local

Salisbury will make history with installation of marker commemorating 1906 lynchings

Local

More than 100 years later, family of World War I veteran receives medals, honors on his behalf

Local

Commissioners to schedule public hearing for Reaper’s Realm rezoning application

Coronavirus

COVID-19 deaths in county grow to 316 as Delta variant spreads

Local

David Freeze: More than expected from western heat

Business

Opening of State Employees’ Credit Union is the fulfillment of a vision for Mary Ponds, Granite Quarry

Local

Swimming: Salisbury native DeSorbo coaching in Olympics

Local

‘Mr. Robert’ retires after 24 years serving children

Lifestyle

Library’s summer reading clock winding down

College

Catawba athletics: Busy fall planned

Local

Community Care Clinic receives grant that will improve its diagnostic capabilities

Business

Biz Roundup: Chamber unveils theme for Total Resource Campaign

Elections

Candidates for local, state races talk with voters at Sloan Park

Education

Summer institute teachers receive $5,000 stipends, eligible for more bonuses

Nation/World

Mask guidance divides parents heading into new school year

Nation/World

Frustration as Biden, Congress allow eviction ban to expire

Crime

Salisbury Police charge 33 during narcotics roundup