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Letters to the editor – Wednesday (3-9-2011)

Chamberlinís Law would help protect animals
Iím writing to encourage support for Chamberlinís Law, which was conceived after two dogs were abandoned and left chained to a tree with no food, water or shelter for months in a High Point yard. Chamberlin was the ěluckyî one. The other dog had to be euthanized.
Although Chamberlin survived, he was left disfigured and unable to walk due to extreme malnourishment. He now moves with the help of a special wheelchair and, after all he has been through, still manages to happily wag his tail.
This law requests modest, but desperately needed changes to the state animal welfare statute to protect helpless animals. It will change the language to ěreckless abuseî of animals in lieu of ěmalicious or intentional abuse,î which is harder to prove. This revision will set minimum standards for shelter, order convicted abusers to seek a form of counseling at their expense and will allow judges to prohibit abusers from ever again having custody of an animal. It will also lead to more convictions of animal abusers in general.
Legislators suggest they have more important issues to debate. Yes, times are hard, but we cannot leave productive legislation on the wayside while we work toward solutions for more complex issues. Besides, what is there to debate? Passage of Chamberlinís Law is simply the right thing to do. We should provide a safe environment for all inhabitants, whether on two legs or four! We need to stand together and stand firm that we will not tolerate any violence in this country, period.
Please urge your state legislators to support this bill. All animals are made of brain, nerve and beating heart, just like us. Our furry friends love us, greet us at the door, and are endlessly optimistic. They know our secrets and they are our best friends. They are North Carolinaís animals and they need us.
ó Mandy Sides
China Grove
Gas price hikes are unfair
We just went to Winston-Salem and on the way back got off Interstate 40 at U.S. 601 in Mocksville. Gas at the interstate was $3.19. Now, if a county so close to Salisbury can sell gas at that price, why are we in Rowan being charged so much? I thought the tax was the same in all of North Carolina. There is no oil shortage. It is the governmentís way of raising prices. Also, how can the stations raise the price on gas that is already in their tanks in the ground? The gas that is in the ground was bought at a lower price than what they raise it to. This is unfair.
ó Kay Flynn
Salisbury
The prophetic answer
A local church bulletin reads, ěWhat is prophecy?î
Answer: ěWe have the prophetic word confirmed as of a light that shineth in a dark place, which you do well to heed, until the day dawns and the morning star arises in your hearts.î (2 Peter 1:19).
They day star or morning star is a designation of Christ.
ó R.D. Earnhardt
Spencer

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