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Letters to the editor – Tuesday (7-8-08)

Blaring stereos, crime are concerns in historic area
My daughter’s friend in Greensboro mentioned that she is planning on moving to a historic area. I suggested Salisbury, and she asked, “Is the car music still loud? I understand there is a lot of theft in the historic areas.”
Salisbury’s reputation is getting to be known. The blaring of car radios on Horah makes visiting on the front porch almost unbearable and conversation impossible. Also, reports to police concerning loud neighborhood music receives the response, “We can’t send someone unless you give us an exact street address.”
Studies reveal that noise can be physically and socially damaging. Excessive noise is associated with hearing loss, sleep deprivation, chronic fatigue and aggravated behavior. A Census Bureau study found that noise is Americans’ top complaint about neighborhoods and the major reason they wish to move. A Department of Justice report indicates that “boom cars” are linked to crime, drugs and gangs.
Many cities have a strong sound ordinance, which allows confiscation of vehicles. Salisbury has a sound ordinance, but there is little enforcement or public awareness. Citizens are not encouraged to be involved in helping to reduce noise.
Theft and violence are also major concerns. These have increased significantly in the Fulton, Ellis, Horah, Bank block. I know of nine houses and properties that have experienced tier slashing, car break-ins, stolen ladders, generators, computers, a camera (($1,500), tools ($1,000), porch planters etc. Surely there is an illegal outlet for these items. Should the State Bureau of Investigation be called in?
A new neighbor is restoring his house. Due to the noise and theft, he plans to sell as soon as possible. Two other owners are considering leaving due to these conditions. When we purchased our home in the West Side Historic District, we expected a pleasing experience instead of a hysterical one.
ó David Willingham
Salisbury
A taste for Faith traditions
I grew up in Faith and relocated out of the area after college. But one of many reasons I still enjoy returning home is to celebrate our nation’s birthday on July 4th in Faith. There are few places today that slow down long enough to celebrate the Fourth of July like Faith does. This small town and its residents have always understood what it means to have and to celebrate freedom, and the many sacrifices that have been made over this country’s history to assure that freedom. For more than 60 years, the tradition for the Faith Fourth has always been a parade of patriotism, banners and flags lining the main street, rides in the park, fireworks, pitcooked barbecue, country ham biscuits and Cheerwine.
But this year that tradition of serving Cheerwine was broken as planning officials decided that making a few extra dollars was more important than tradition and made a decision to instead select another soft drink to be served exclusively in the park. Some things make good business sense and are the right thing to do, but there are some things that tradition and common sense will always dictate over making money. Particularly in light of Cheerwine being the soda that has always been associated with the Faith Fourth and with Rowan County. I hope next year that planning officials will use better judgment and put tradition above the desire to try and squeeze more profit from the weeklong celebration. I’m confident the very civic minded persons who make up the civic organizations and who benefit from the divided profits of the week would forgo a little extra in profits for the return of Rowan County’s hometown drink to this state’s one-of-a-kind Fourth of July celebration.
ó Keith McCombs
Raleigh
Good job, Explorers
Rowan County Sheriff’s Office Explorers have been really active here lately, especially during the Faith Fourth of July events.
They have resolved a lot of conflicts and stopped some before they had a chance to happen. Thank you for all you do, and God bless all.
ó Miranda Brady
Faith

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