Authors Hauter, Payne and Knowles in town this week

  • Posted: Sunday, May 5, 2013 12:01 a.m.

Upcoming events at Literary Bookpost:

• Thursday, 5:30-8 p.m., “Foodopoly: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America,” by Wenonah Hauter.


Hauter is the executive director of Food & Water Watch, but she also runs an organic family farm in Northern Virginia that provides healthy vegetables to more than 500 families in the Washington, D.C., area as part of the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. Despite this, as one of the nation’s leading healthy food advocates, Hauter believes that the local food movement is not enough to solve America’s food crisis and the public health debacle it has created. In “Foodopoly,” she takes aim at the real culprit: the massive consolidation and corporate control of food production, which prevents farmers from raising healthy crops and limits the choices that people can make in the grocery store.

Through meticulous research, Hauter presents a shocking account of how agricultural policy has been hijacked by lobbyists, driving out independent farmers and food processors in favor of the likes of Cargill, Tyson, Kraft and ConAgra. She demonstrates how the impacts ripple far and wide, from economic stagnation in rural communities at home, to famines in poor countries overseas. In the end, Hauter illustrates how solving this crisis will require a complete structural shift, a grassroots movement to reshape our food system from seed to table — a change that is about politics, not just personal choice.

• Friday, 6-8 p.m., Friendship: The Crazy Ladies Book Tour, featuring two N.C. authors, Peggy Payne and Carrie Knowles.

Payne is author of “About Cobalt Blue”: Burned out from work and a recent breakup, Andie Branson, a 38-year-old commercial artist in a conservative town in the American South, has a shocking and unexpected religious experience, kundalini rising, the physical manifestation of tantric enlightenment. Andie’s struggle to regain control of her mind and body is complicated by a too close connection with her glamorous world-wandering parents, especially her magnetically attractive father, and by an assignment working closely with a bigoted U.S. senator, the man who, for her, personifies evil. Her story ranges from the elegant little golf town of Pinehurst, to the raucous and shadowy byways of pre-Katrina New Orleans, with pauses in India, Ecuador and other exotic locations. Andie finds her redemption finally through ecstatic religious ritual, the mysterious healing properties of water, and by claiming and steering the power that has erupted within her.

Knowles wrote “Lillian’s Garden”: When a brazen new preacher comes to town, one family finds their devils in the hidden silences of their lives. Just when Helen thinks she can take charge of her life, a devil-hunting itinerant preacher upsets the delicate balance she has managed in a family locked in secrets and headed for trouble. When Helen breaks down, her husband, Richard, angry and ashamed, commits her to a mental institution without telling their children where their mother has gone. “Lillian’s Garden” is a novel about failure and finding redemption through learning how to ask for what you want and accepting what love has given you.

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