NFL Notebook: UNC’s Bernard has family ties to league

  • Posted: Sunday, April 28, 2013 3:30 p.m.
Cincinnati Bengals second-round draft pick Giovani Bernard, a halfback out of North Carolina, (25), second-round draft pick Margus Hunt, a defensive end out of Southern Methodist, (99), and third-round draft pick Shawn Williams, a safety out of Georgia, (40) hold up the numbers they will wear for the NFL football team as they were introduced at a press conference, Saturday, April 27, 2013, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)
Cincinnati Bengals second-round draft pick Giovani Bernard, a halfback out of North Carolina, (25), second-round draft pick Margus Hunt, a defensive end out of Southern Methodist, (99), and third-round draft pick Shawn Williams, a safety out of Georgia, (40) hold up the numbers they will wear for the NFL football team as they were introduced at a press conference, Saturday, April 27, 2013, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

Associated Press

The NFL notebook ...

The list is long, but nearly two dozen players drafted will be following in the NFL footsteps of fathers, brothers, cousins and uncles. Here’s a sampling:


Bengals running back Gio Bernard out of North Carolina is the brother of Yvenson Bernard, who spent time with the Rams and Seahawks in 2008; quarterback Geno Smith (Jets) is a cousin of former Broncos running back Melvin Bratton; Ravens running back Kyle Juszczyk’s great uncle, Rich Moore, was the No. 12 overall pick in the 1969 draft by the Packers; Bills wide receiver Robert Woods’ father, Robert, was a fifth-round pick of the Chiefs in 1978 and played for them, the Browns, Oilers and Lions; Rams free safety T.J. McDonald’s father, Tim played 13 seasons for the Cardinals and 49ers from 1987-1999.

Bears guard Kyle Long is the son of Hall of Famer Howie Long (Raiders) and brother of Chris Long, an All-Pro now with the Rams; Colts center Khaled Holmes’ brother, Alex, played for the Dolphins in 2005, and his brother-in-law, Troy Polamalu, is a seven-time Pro Bowler for the Steelers; Texans offensive tackle Brennan Williams’ father, Brent, played for the Patriots, Seahawks and Jets from 1986-1996; Ravens linebacker Arthur Brown’s brother, Bryce Brown, plays for the Eagles; Falcons defensive back Desmond Trufant’s brother, Marcus Trufant, plays for the Seahawks, and another brother, Isaiah, has played on the practice squads for the Jets and Eagles; and Eagles defensive end Joe Kruger’s brother, Paul Kruger, plays for the Ravens.

ROLL, IVY

This was one special draft for the Ivy League. Known for turning out doctors, lawyers, economists and presidents, the league saw three of its players picked in the three-day NFL draft. That may not sound like many, but consider this: in the past six draft, NFL teams picked a total of three players from the league,

And the winners are:

• Cornell tackle J.C. Tretter, a fourth-round pick (No. 122) by Green Bay.

• Harvard running back Kyle Juszczyk, a fourth-round compensatory pick (No. 130) by Baltimore.

• Princeton linebacker Mike Catapano, a seventh-round pick (No. 207) by Kansas City.

QB TO WR

ALLEN PARK, Mich. (AP) — Denard Robinson’s wait for a new employer stretched to the final day of the NFL draft, but the former Michigan standout didn’t have to wait long.

The Jacksonville Jaguars selected him early in Saturday’s fifth round with the 135th overall pick and plan to use him as a running back and kick returner.

“They can put me in at receiver or running back or whatever,” he said in an interview posted on the team’s website. “There’s a lot of different positions so I’m excited about doing that.”

He was a quarterback in former Wolverines coach Rich Rodriguez’s spread system but shifted to other skill positions during his senior season after an injury and the emergence of passer Devin Gardner. Jacksonville had one of the league’s worst offenses last season but new general manager Dave Caldwell and head coach Gus Bradley seemed mostly intent on finding players to augment the secondary in the later rounds of the draft.

Robinson started 35 games at quarterback for the Wolverines and set an NCAA record for career rushing yards (4,495) by a signal-caller.

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