Eclectic shop Zinc opens near Rail Walk, future Lee Street Theater

  • Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2013 12:53 a.m.
    UPDATED: Sunday, February 10, 2013 3:46 p.m.
Amy Haynie, Wendy Beeker (formerly operator of the boutique Grayshores Trading Co.) and Nancy Truax has joined forces to open a new shop at 314 Depot St. under the name Zinc. Photo by Jon C. Lakey, Salisbury Post.
Amy Haynie, Wendy Beeker (formerly operator of the boutique Grayshores Trading Co.) and Nancy Truax has joined forces to open a new shop at 314 Depot St. under the name Zinc. Photo by Jon C. Lakey, Salisbury Post.

SALISBURY — Three women have opened a quirky shop across from the Salisbury Depot in an area of downtown they believe is the next hot spot.

Zinc

Zinc

What: Eclectic boutique featuring French country cottage, shabby chic and industrial merchandise, including jewelry, handbags and other fair-trade items. From small details to big furniture. Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. Do-it-yourself furniture painting classes, starting Feb. 16.

Where: 314 Depot St.

When: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday

Who: Owners Amy Flynn Haynie, Nancy Truax and Wendy Beeker, formerly of Grayshores Trading Co.

Coming soon: Outdoor vintage flea market the second Sunday of each month, starting in April.


Wendy Beeker has moved Grayshores Trading Co., her eclectic South Main Street boutique, to 314 Depot St., where she's gone into business with Nancy Truax and Amy Flynn Haynie. The trio are focused on motivating their shabby-chic-loving sisters to tap their inner creativity with everything from whimsical home decor and vintage accessories to painted furniture and do-it-yourself classes.


Zinc features Beeker's French country cottage painted pieces, Truax's vintage furniture and accessories and Haynie's repurposed industrial furniture and fair-trade handcrafted items.

Tucked across the street from the Salisbury Depot and behind White Tire Center, Zinc stands in Betty Mickle's former antique shop. Mickle still owns the building.

The name “Zinc” reflects the whimsy of the merchandise, as well as the shop's industrial-like surroundings.

“We think this is the up and coming area in town,” Truax said.

Step beside Zinc into a grassy area the women plan to transform into an outdoor venue and find the end of a red brick trail that leads to the Looking Glass Artists Center and Rail Walk art studios and galleries on North Lee Street. Just a hop, skip and a jump from Zinc, the Lee Street Theatre company is renovating an old warehouse to create a permanent home.

“With the theater coming down here, in 18 months this area will be crazy busy,” Beeker said.

The Salisbury Rowan Farmers Market is considering moving into a parking lot across from the depot, and Historic Salisbury Foundation and Salisbury Emporium make fine neighbors, she said.

Their only wish for the area — a restaurant.

Since opening on Jan. 4, Zinc has done better than expected, Beeker said. Not only did her former Grayshores customers follow her to the new location, but new customers have been coming in daily to check it out.

With sales up and expenses now split three ways, Beeker said going into business with Truax and Haynie was a good financial decision. But more than that, the partnership offers creative and emotional support and, more practically, a chance to leave the store during the day without worry.

Beeker had been flying solo in retail for 12 years. For the first time last week, she went to a weekday doctor's appointment and didn't have to close the shop.

Truax and Beeker mind the store, which is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Haynie, who lives and works in Charlotte, stops in at least once a week to bring new merchandise and confer.

“The best part for me is having partners,” Beeker said. “Someone would have an idea, and someone would build on it, and by the time it got to the third person, it would be something I could not even have imagined.”

While most of the items in the shop are Beeker's from Grayshores, the trio hope to soon split the floor space evenly three ways.

Beeker brings to the business vintage painted furniture, as well as new gift items like candles, scarves and bath products. She also is one of 340 U.S. distributors for Annie Sloan Chalk Paint, which has helped her develop a loyal following.

Beeker teaches do-it-yourself technique classes for people who want to learn to use the unique paint.

Haynie, a sales representative for several fair trade companies, brings to Zinc handcrafted jewelry, wallets, bells and other items made by women across the globe. She and her husband create one-of-a-kind industrial furniture from repurposed materials and reclaimed wood.

Haynie also manages the company's social media and web presence, including Facebook, Pinterest, Etsy and a blog.

Truax brings, well, “funky stuff,” as she puts it. A longtime collector, Truax uses vintage clothing, furniture and accessories to create elaborate displays in the store. The displays change every week because many of the pieces go home with customers.

None of the women knew each other until a few years ago. Two walked into Grayshores — Truax a customer and Haynie a sales rep — and hit it off with Beeker.

They've been planning to do a project together ever since, and Zinc was born.

In April, Zinc will launch an outdoor vintage flea market with all-female vendors planned for the second Sunday of every month.

“We are all about promoting other women,” Truax said.

A 1930s bicycle that belonged to Beeker's mother-in-law greets customers as they walk into Zinc. Hanging from the ceiling and bedecked with white lights, the bike served as reliable transportation for Beeker's husband, Jock, when he delivered the Salisbury Post at age 10.

Like the bike, the displays in Zinc have a sense of humor and encourage creative decorating ideas. The women have two “pickers” who scout estate sales and auctions to find potential Zinc merchandise, but the owners provide much of the inventory themselves.

Just don't ask them to reveal where they find their treasures. They guard that information like a fisherman with a favorite fishing hole.

“We have places,” Beeker said with a smile. “Secret places.”

Contact Emily Ford at 704-797-4264.

Zinc

What: Eclectic boutique featuring French country cottage, shabby chic and industrial merchandise, including jewelry, handbags and other fair-trade items. From small details to big furniture. Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. Do-it-yourself furniture painting classes, starting Feb. 16.

Where: 314 Depot St.

When: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday

Who: Owners Amy Flynn Haynie, Nancy Truax and Wendy Beeker, formerly of Grayshores Trading Co.

Coming soon: Outdoor vintage flea market the second Sunday of each month, starting in April.

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