March 3, 2015

4-H has programs teachers can use

Published 12:00 am Friday, September 21, 2012

By Sara Drake
For the Salisbury Post
SALISBURY – North Carolina Cooperative Extension, through its 4-H Youth Development Program, offers numerous opportunities for classroom teachers. The 4-H School Enrichment Program provides the opportunity for 4-H and local schools (private, public and homeschool) to team up to offer hands-on, classroom enrichment programs. The Rowan County 4-H program provides educational materials, resources and training to classroom teachers.
Rowan County 4-H offers the following programs: Embryology, Bug Out, Soil Solutions, Magic of Electricity, Aerospace, Vermicomposting, Energy Transformation and the Power of the Wind.
The embryology program offers the opportunity to explore the science of embryology from egg to chicken. Classrooms are provided with incubators, turners, chick life cycle sets and resource materials. Four sessions are offered throughout the year.
Bug Out is a series of insect-based activities that emphasizes hands-on learning. The goal of Bug Out is to increase understanding and appreciation of insects and to reduce fear of insects.
Soil Solutions allows the opportunity to explore the interdependence of plants and soils. With this curriculum, students gain an understanding of nutrients, pollination and soil types.
The Magic of Electricity curriculum helps students explore magnetism, circuits, conductors and the flow of electricity.
Through the aerospace program, youth are able to fly kites, participate in airplane contests, launch rockets, explore space, make a glider, construct a straw rocket and experience disorientation.
The 4-H Vermicomposting program offers students an opportunity to explore a micro-community. Having a worm bin in the classroom enables students to learn about organic decomposition, the soil food web and the relationship between earthworms and ecological sustainability.
The Energy Transformation curriculum, developed in partnership with Progress Energy and N.C State University, includes lessons and activities that allow students to explore energy sources and heat transfer, historical aspects of energy sources and energy’s economic and environmental implications for the future.
The Power of the Wind curriculum provides additional information concerning forces and motion. It allows students to think like an engineer as they design and build pinwheels and wind powered boats.
Contact Sara Drake, 4-H Extension Agent, at sara_drake@ncsu.edu or at 704-216-8970 for additional information about these programs.

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